ARCHITECTURAL GUIDELINES FOR THE NORTHEAST PROVINCE

SITING

• Select from limited building sites because of topography and regulations to protect the landscape character. 

• Orient and cluster rural buildings toward and

near roadways rather than lined up along a

road. (Figure of building structures oriented toward roads and staggered at varying distances.) When practical, cluster buildings around a common site, as seen in a village green or

town center.  (Figure showing village buildings clustered around a common site)

 

• Tuck buildings into the edges of clearings and at changes in grade. (Figure showing buildings tucked into the vegetation on the edge of a clearing and figure from the Allegheny region of sun exposure and circulation of air around roof.) 

 

 

• Design buildings to step down grades rather than leveling site. (Figure of three buildings sited on stepped down grades preserving the natural landform.)

 

• Design roads to be site sensitive. They should

follow contours of the land like a river weaving

through landscape.

• Landscape the site for snow storage.

• Berm the back wall of buildings into slopes.

• Visually screen structures by planting banks

of native vegetation.

• Detach outdoor space from the building with

gardens or plazas (no attached decks). (Figure of outdoor shaded patio space detached from main structure.)

 

MASSING AND SCALE

“Simplify, simplify.” —Henry David Thoreau

• Break functions into smaller building wings as

opposed to using one big building. (Figure of large single structure broken into several smaller forms.)

• Make buildings appear to have grown organically through additions over time. (Figure of large simple building with similar small building attached.)

• Design rectangular buildings, as in barns or

saltbox houses.

• Use traditional building heights from one and a half to two stories that remain well suited for tight, restricted sites.

• Use narrow, horizontal siding and small, punched

window openings to reduce the apparent mass

of a building.

• Do not design rambling, irregular Victorian or Queen Anne-style building volumes. (Example of building of complicated irregular forms)

 

• Include small porches.

• Make the chimneys visible on the gable side.

• Match larger buildings in scale to a larger backdrop. (Figures of the building’s mass in relation to its surroundings: One story building in landscape of short vegetation and moderate hills and a three story building in landscape of tall vegetation and steeper hills.)

RTHEAST

BASE

Bases are both functional and symbolic. They

suggest permanence and solidity when expressed

and celebrated using solid, textured materials.

A weathering base creates a platform that

protects the rest of the building from frost,

mud, and snow.

• Sink the base below the frost line.

• Use traditional, random-pattern stone bases.

• Select stones that match local stones.

• Lay stone in patterns that mimic local geology.

• Create textures with synthetic materials by

coloring concrete or using split-face stone.

 

WALLS

Walls are the primary elements of architecture in

this province. Wall materials are usually wood in

horizontal patterns. Suitable

materials include:

• Clapboards.

• Weathered shingles painted white

or red.

• Vertical corner-boards painted in

contrasting colors.

 

WINDOWS AND OPENINGS

Windows are typically small, double-hung, and

divided (traditionally up to 12 panes over 12 panes).

• Arrange windows for symmetry.

• Avoid strip windows in horizontal bands.

• Use lintels, sills, and pediments for ornamental

purposes.

• Use single doors instead of double doors.

• Use porches for public entries to buildings.

• Use simple entries for nonpublic buildings.

• Include air locks or vestibules.

 

ROOFS

• Design roof pitch to ranges from 6:12 to 12:12

• Use gable shape instead of a flat or shed style

(unless shed extends from main building).

• Include slate, shingle, simulated shingle, or

metal material.

• Reduce ice damage with a minimal (if any)

overhang.

• Include gutters to keep walls dry.

• Use thin eaves and bargeboards.

• Integrate cupola for venting.

• Avoid exposed rafter tails for maintenance

reasons.

• Make gables and sheds simple and uncluttered.

• Include snow and ice guards on metal roofs

where “snow dump” is an issue.

 

STRUCTURE

Buildings of this province do not typically include

heavily expressed or exposed structural members.

Rustic, CCC-inspired buildings are suitable for

picnic and cabin structures in remote areas,

but they are out of character in settings

classified as developed on the ROS.

• Avoid exposed structure on exterior;

• Include some exposed timber framing

on the interior.

 

Typical roof elements include:

• Gable roof

• Cupola for roof venting

• Simple gable dormers

• Minimal overhang

• Narrow fascia board

(no exposed rafters)

 

Use Simple porch entries such as gable porch and shed porch.

 

NHEAST

MATERIALS

• Use durable, natural, local materials such as

stone, wood, and clapboard. Alternatives

include textured, colored concrete block.

• Use metal or vinyl siding for low-maintenance

utilitarian buildings.

Avoid:

• Stucco or synthetic stucco.

• Asphalt-shingle siding.

• Glass “curtain” wall.

• Metal buildings in public areas.

• High-tech looking, sleek, or

smooth materials.

• Mediterranean tile.

Suitable site materials include:

• Crushed granite.

• Granite curbs.

• Stamped concrete for walkways.

• Concrete pavers (tumbled block

to add texture and look rustic).

• Waste quarry stone.

 

Appropriate roof materials include:

Wood, slate, fiber-cement, or composition shingles, and seamed metal

 

COLOR

Take cues from the setting, emphasizing blues,

grays, and browns. Follow the ROS guidelines:

• Naturally weathering materials and earth tones

with no accents in primitive or semi-primitive settings.

• Naturally weathering materials and earth tones

with limited accents drawn from nature in roaded natural settings.

• White, red, gray, and naturally weathering

materials in rural settings.

• Warm earth tones with a wide range of accents

in rural settings.

Other Guidelines:

• Contrast colors in “detail areas” such as

windows and doors. For example, use dark

trim with a light wall and light trim with a

dark wall.

• Paint porch ceilings using historical colors,

such as robin’s egg or sky blue.

 

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