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Accessibility Guidebook for Outdoor Recreation and Trails

Applying the Forest Service Outdoor Recreation Accessibility Guidelines (Continued)

Other Constructed Features

Warming Huts

Permanent, fully enclosed buildings are not warming huts. Permanent buildings with walls, roof, and a door must meet all the applicable requirements of the ABAAS. Warming huts are temporary or partially enclosed spaces used intermittently for brief periods as protection from the weather. If amenities such as tables or wood stoves are provided in warming huts, they must meet the requirements of FSORAG sections 1 through 5 explained above. In addition, a turning space at least 60 inches (1,525 millimeters) in diameter (see figure 81) or "T" shaped with a minimum 60- by 36-inch (1,525- by 915-millimeter) "arm" and a minimum 36-inch- (915-millimeter-) wide by 24-inch- (610-millimeter-) long "base" (see figure 82) must be provided inside the hut. This requirement is the same as ABAAS section 304.3.

Warming huts in recreation sites must be connected to other major features of the recreation area by an ORAR. If the floor of the hut is above ground level, the ORAR can either ramp up to floor level, or it can end adjacent to the tent platform 17 to 19 inches (430 to 485 millimeters) lower than the platform. This height allows someone to transfer from a wheelchair to the platform. Warming huts provided in GFAs don't have to be connected to an ORAR.

Outdoor Rinsing Showers

Even though the ABAAS sections 607, 608, and 609 cover showers, outdoor rinsing showers are specifically addressed in the FSORAG because the ABAAS description and provisions are intended for indoor facilities. Outdoor showers permit people to rinse off sand, dirt, and debris. They are not intended for bathing. They generally don't offer privacy and people usually are not permitted to disrobe.

Two types of outdoor rinsing showers are addressed: a low shower, accessible to someone in a seated position, and a high shower accessible to someone who is standing. If two or more outdoor rinsing showers are provided in a recreation site, at least one must be a low shower meeting the requirements explained below and at least one must be a high shower meeting the requirements explained below. If only one outdoor rinsing shower is provided, it must meet the requirements and be usable from both a seated and standing position. Accessible outdoor rinsing showers must be connected to the other major features of the recreation area by an ORAR. There is no exception to the ORAR because outdoor rinsing showers aren't typically found in GFAs.

For a low outdoor rinsing shower, a fixed shower head must be mounted between 48 and 54 inches (1,220 and 1,370 millimeters) above the ground or floor, the same as the ABAAS requirement for accessible indoor showers. For a high outdoor rinsing shower, a fixed shower head must be mounted at least 72 inches (1,830 millimeters) above the ground or floor. A hand-held shower spray unit complying with ABAAS section 608.6 may be used in place of a fixed shower head. Hand-held showerheads are vulnerable to vandalism and breakage, so they are probably not a good design choice for most recreation sites. A more durable choice would be to mount low and high showerheads on one pole or wall.

Grab bars for accessible outdoor rinsing showers are not used for transfers, but are essential for stability in a wet environment. Three types of grab bars are addressed in this section: vertical, circular, and horizontal. Vertical and circular grab bars are used with showers mounted on posts. Horizontal grab bars are used with shower heads mounted on walls. Every outdoor rinsing shower must have at least one vertical, circular, or horizontal grab bar.

Grab bars for accessible outdoor rinsing showers must comply with the standard reach ranges of ABAAS section 308 that are explained in Reach Ranges and Operability Requirements. Grab bar size, position, mounting requirements, and structural strength are explained in Grab Bars. The location requirements for grab bars at outdoor rinsing showers are explained below.

If a vertical grab bar is provided at a shower head mounted on a post, the grab bar must be installed directly under the shower head. It must extend from no more than 33 inches (840 millimeters) above the floor or ground to within 3 inches (75 millimeters) of the shower head (figure 89).

Illustration of an outdoor rinsing shower. Two people are playing with a beach ball near the shore in the background. The rinsing shower has two heads located on opposite sides of a post and vertical grab bars. Dimensions show the clear space and grab bar location requirements explained in the paragraphs above.
Figure 89—The requirements for a vertical grab bar.

If the shower head is mounted on a post, a circular grab bar may be used in place of a vertical grab bar. The grab bar must surround the usable part of the post and be installed under the shower head between 33 and 36 inches (840 and 915 millimeters) above the ground or floor (figure 90).

Illustration of an outdoor rinsing shower. Two people with floating toys are walking toward a beach in the background. The rinsing shower has two heads located on adjacent sides of a post. A grab bar circles the post. Dimensions show the clear space and grab bar location requirements explained in the paragraphs above.
Figure 90—The requirements for a circular grab bar.

If a shower head is mounted on a wall, a horizontal grab bar must be provided. The grab bar must be installed under the shower head between 33 and 36 inches (840 and 915 millimeters) above the ground or floor and extend at least 18 inches (455 millimeters) in both directions from the center line of the shower head (figure 91).

Illustration of two shower heads on the outside of a building wall. Each shower head has a horizontal grab bar. Dimensions show the clear space and grab bar location requirements explained in the paragraphs above.
Figure 91—The requirements for horizontal grab bars.

Rinsing shower controls and operating mechanisms must comply with the provisions for reach ranges and operability specified in ABAAS sections 308 and 309 as explained in Reach Ranges and Operability Requirements. If self-closing controls are used, the controls must remain open for at least 10 seconds.

A clear floor or ground space at least 60 inches (1,525 millimeters) in diameter must be provided at each accessible outdoor rinsing shower. It must be located so that the water from the shower head is directed toward the center of the clear space. The slope of the clear space can't exceed 1:33 (3 percent) in any direction. The surface must be firm and stable and made from a material that is appropriate to the level of development and the setting.

Signs

Signs provide key information concerning the accessibility of programs and facilities. In accordance with ABAAS section 216, the International Symbol of Accessibility must be posted at six places:

The International Symbol of Accessibility can only be posted where all constructed features and areas comply with the ABAAS. Except for the requirement to post the word "VAN" on the parking sign at van accessible spaces, no words are required to be used with the symbol. If words are used with the ISA, use "Accessible"; DO NOT use "Handicapped"!

There is NO legal requirement on federally managed lands for International Symbol of Accessibility signs to be blue and white, even at parking spaces. If the International Symbol of Accessibility is used, it must be posted in accordance with ABAAS section 703.7, in high-contrast colors with a nonglare finish. A cream or pale yellow International Symbol of Accessibility on a brown background complies with this requirement and blends into an outdoor setting.

If you want the local law enforcement agency to be able to issue tickets for illegal parking at accessible parking spaces, the International Symbol of Accessibility must be displayed in blue and white and comply with the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) section 2B.39. Although their use is optional, the only approved colors for pavement markings designating accessible parking spaces are blue and white (MUTCD section 3B.18).

If a sign or kiosk has materials such as maps, brochures, fee envelopes, and so forth, the sign or kiosk must be designed to meet the standard accessible reach ranges in accordance with ABAAS section 308, as explained in Reach Ranges and Operability Requirements. Clear floor or ground spaces of 30 by 48 inches (760 by 1,220 millimeters) must be provided to allow a forward or side approach.

Post the appropriate international symbols where various modes of adaptive equipment are available, such as TTY (teletypewriter), sign language interpreters, assistive listening systems, and so forth (figures 92 through 101).

Figures 92 to 101-International symbols indicating accessibility.

Illustration of an question mark inside a circle.
Figure 92—Information.
Schematic illustration of a person using a wheelchair.
Figure 93—International Symbol of Accessibility.
Schematic illustration of a telephone handset with keyboard keys under it.
Figure 94—Teletypewriter (frequently abbreviated as "TTY").
Schematic illustration of a telephone handset with six curved lines schematically representing sound waves to the right of the top end of the handset.
Figure 95—Telephone with volume control.
Illustration of the letters cc.
Figure 96—Video or film is closed caption.
Illustration of the letters AD. Three curved lines schematically representing sound waves are at the right side of the letter D.
Figure 97—Audio description available.
Schematic illustration of an ear with two curved lines representing sound waves to the right of the upper ear, and schematic representation of a sliding volume adjustment bar below the opening of the ear.
Figure 98—Assistive listening system available.
Schematic illustration of two adjacent hands. The index finger and thumb are touching in the shape of a circle on both of the hands. Other fingers of the left hand point up and the right hand point down.
Figure 99—Sign language interpretation available.
Text reading: Large Print.
Figure 100—Large-print (18-point) materials available.
Illustration of six dots, with three dots located side-by-side in two columns. Below the dots is text that reads: Braille.
Figure 101—Materials available in Braille.

If you have questions about applying any of the above information, please contact your region's recreation accessibility coordinator. Current contact information is available on the Forest Service's internal computer network at http://fsweb.mtdc.wo.fs.fed.us/toolbox/acc/documents/coord.htm.

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