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Research Paper

Title: Economic value of big game habitat production from natural and prescribed fire

Author: González-Cabán, Armando; Loomis, John B.; Griffin, Dana; Wu, Elen; McCollum, Daniel; McKeever, Jane; Freeman, Diane

Date: 2003

Source: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 38 p.

Station ID: RP-PSW-249

Description: A macro time-series model and a micro GIS model were used to estimate a production function relating deer harvest response to prescribed fire, holding constant other environmental variables. The macro time-series model showed a marginal increase in deer harvested of 33 for an increase of 1,100 acres of prescribed burn. The marginal deer increase for the micro GIS model was 16. An additional 3,710 acres of prescribed burn would produce an additional eight deer harvested regardless of the model. For an additional 3,700 acres more of prescribed burn the marginal increase in deer harvested is four and five deer respectively for the macro time-series and micro GIS models. Using the Travel Cost Method the change in consumer surplus or net willingness-to-pay was $257 per additional deer harvested due to the additional trips in response to increasing deer harvest. The consumer surplus estimate using the Contingent Valuation Method was $222. Depending on the production function model used the initial deer hunting benefit response to a prescribed burning of 1,100 acres ranges from $3,840 to $7,920. An additional increase of 3,710 acres of prescribed burning would produce benefits of $1,920 regardless of the model used. An extra 3,700 acres more would produce only between $960 and $1,200 depending on the model. When compared to the cost of conducting the prescribed burning, the benefits derived from an increase in deer harvest represent no more than 3.4 percent of the total costs of the first 1,100 acres.

Key Words: contingent valuation, deer hunting benefits, fire economics, prescribed burning costs, travel cost method, willingness-to-pay

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Citation

González-Cabán, Armando; Loomis, John B.; Griffin, Dana; Wu, Elen; McCollum, Daniel; McKeever, Jane; Freeman, Diane  2003.  Economic value of big game habitat production from natural and prescribed fire  Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 38 p.

Last Modified: Nov 18, 2013 12:47:22 PM