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Research Paper

Title: Benefits of Eucalyptus-Albizia mixtures vary by site on Hawaii Island

Author: DeBell, Dean S.; Whitesell, Craig D.; Crabb, Thomas B.

Date: 1987

Source: Res. Paper PSW-RP-187. Berkeley, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station; 6 p

Station ID: RP-PSW-187

Description: Eucalyptus saligna Sm. plantations are being tested in Hawaii as a means of providing biomass for conversion to energy. Initial growth rates have been excellent, but supplemental nitrogen (N) is needed for sustained productivity on most sites. Although responses to N fertilizer have been substantial, costs of N applications are costly in dollars and energy. The possibility of planting leguminous trees with Eucalyptus to provide the needed N was therefore investigated. In this paper, we compare the growth of E. saligna in pure, N-fertilized stands with that of E. saligna and Albizia falcataria (L.) Fosberg, a leguminous tree, in mixed (50:50) stands at four sites on the island of Hawaii. At two sites located on the wet, northeast coast, Eucalyptus in the mixed stands grew taller, were larger in diameter, and had higher foliar concentrations of N and P than Eucalyptus in pure stands. Albizia grew very well at these sites, and, in some cases, overtopped the Eucalyptus. Growth of Eucalyptus in both the pure and mixed stands was excellent at the other two sites located near the much drier, southeast coast. In the mixed stands, however, Albizia, grew very poorly and had no beneficial effect on Eucalyptus growth. Thus, Eucalyptus-Albizia mixtures can replace the need for repeated N applications in bioenergy plantations along the wet, northeast coast. In the drier, southeast district, however, productivity of such mixtures will be lower than that of pure Eucalyptus stands.

Key Words: Eucalyptus saligna, Albizia falcataria, Hawaii, species-mixtures, nitrogen fertilization

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Citation

DeBell, Dean S.; Whitesell, Craig D.; Crabb, Thomas B.  1987.  Benefits of Eucalyptus-Albizia mixtures vary by site on Hawaii Island  Res. Paper PSW-RP-187. Berkeley, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station; 6 p.

Last Modified: Nov 18, 2013 12:46:47 PM