USDA Forest Service
 

Pacific Southwest Research Station

 

Pacific Southwest Research Station
800 Buchanan Street
West Annex Building
Albany, CA 94710-0011

(510) 559-6300

United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service. USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.

Programs and Projects

(RWU-4202)

Sierra Nevada Research Center

Photo of John Keane

John Keane
Research Ecologist
Principal Research Scientist
Terrestrial Ecology
Phone: (530) 759-1704

Pacific Southwest Research Station
Sierra Nevada Research Center
1731 Research Park Dr.
Davis, CA 95618

Ph: (530) 759-1700
Fx: (530) 747-0241

Education
B.S. Zoology, 1986, San Francisco State University, CA
M.S. Wildland Resources Science, 1991, University of California, Berkeley, CA
Ph.D. Ecology, 1999, University of California, Davis, CA
Research Interests/Duties
My research interests are focused on the ecology, conservation, and management of species and systems. With my research colleagues we investigate questions concerning habitat relationships, demography, interspecific interactions, and the environmental and physical factors that determine the distribution and abundance of animal species and assemblages. This basic knowledge of natural history provides the ecological context for assessing the effects of anthropogenic influences, ranging from site-specific to ecoregional spatial scales. In turn this information contributes to ecoregional assessments and planning efforts requiring knowledge of management, conservation, and restoration priorities. In recent years I have focused on assessing vulnerability risk across the vertebrate species assemblage in the Sierra Nevada ecoregion, conducting studies of raptors (i.e., hawks, owls, falcons, eagles, vultures), both in the Sierra Nevada and across California, and on the development of ecoregional management and monitoring plans for the Sierra Nevada. Our research on Sierran vertebrate assemblages has focused on development of methods using information on population size, trend, distribution, range change, habitat associations, and other life history characteristics to assess the vulnerability of species to future population decline and extinction risk. The goal of this work is to provide objective and defensible methods for prioritizing species for conservation, research, and monitoring. Raptor studies are focused on the status, distribution, migration, habitat relationships, demography, population trends, monitoring, and response to management of species across California, with particular emphasis on California spotted owls and northern goshawks. In addition to basic and applied research in these topic areas, I am also interested in the development of integrative, multi-disciplinary ecoregional assessments and in the development and testing of monitoring designs to assess the effects of management.
Selected Publications

Franklin, A.B., R. J. Gutiérrez, J.D. Nichols, M.E. Seamans, G.C. White, G.S. Zimmerman, J.E. Hines, T.E. Munton, W.S. LaHaye, J.A. Blakesley, G.N. Steger, B.R. Noon, D.W. H. Shaw, J.J. Keane, T.L. McDonald, and S.Britting. In Press. Population Dynamics of the California spotted owl: a meta-analysis. Ornithological Monographs.

Anderson, D.E., S. DeStefano, M.I. Goldstein, K. Titus, C. Crocker-Bedford, J.J. Keane, R.G. Anthony, and R.N. Rosenfield. In Press. Technical Review of the status of northern goshawks in the western United States. Technical report provided to The Wildlife Society and Raptor Research Foundation.

Keane, J.J., A.J. Lind, and A. Bradley. 2001. Assessment of Species Vulnerability and Prioritization. Sierra Nevada Forest Plan Amendment: Final Environmental Impact Statement Volume 4: Appendix R. USDA Forest Service, Sacramento CA.

Keane, J.J. 2001. Northern Goshawk: affected environment and environmental consequences. Sierra Nevada Forest Plan Amendment: Final Environmental Impact Statement Volume 3, Part 4.4.2.2, Pages 113-142. USDA Forest Service, Sacramento CA.

Keane. J.J. 2001. Diurnal and Nocturnal Raptors. Unpublished report. Abstracted in support of Sierra Nevada Forest Plan Amendment: Final Environmental Impact Statement Volume 3, Part 4.2.3.2, Pages 39-47. USDA Forest Service, Sacramento CA.

Lee, D.C., J.J. Keane, and D. Lipton. 2001. California spotted owl: affected environment and environmental consequences. Sierra Nevada Forest Plan Amendment: Final Environmental Impact Statement Volume 3, Part 4.4.2.1, Pages 70-112. USDA Forest Service, Sacramento CA.

Keane, J.J. 2000. Northern Goshawk: affected environment and environmental consequences. Sierra Nevada Forest Plan Amendment: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Volume 2, Pages 353-363. USDA Forest Service, Sacramento CA.

Keane. J.J. 2000. Diurnal and Nocturnal Raptors: affected environment and environmental consequences. Sierra Nevada Forest Plan Amendment: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Volume 2, Pages 303-311. USDA Forest Service, Sacramento CA.

Lee, D.C., J.J. Keane, and D. Lipton. 2000. California spotted owl: affected environment and environmental consequences. Sierra Nevada Forest Plan Amendment: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Volume 2, Pages 333-352. USDA Forest Service, Sacramento CA.

Keane, J.J., A.J. Lind, and A. Bradley. 2000. Assessment of Species Vulnerability and Prioritization. Sierra Nevada Forest Plan Amendment: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Volume 3: Appendix R. USDA Forest Service, Sacramento CA.

Keane, J.J. 2000. Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis). Pages 41-52. In D.D. Murphy and C.M. Knopp [eds.], Lake Tahoe Watershed Assessment: Volume II, Appendix O. PSW-GTR-176. USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, Albany, CA.

Manley, P.N., W.J. Zielinski, C.M. Stuart, J.J. Keane, A.J. Lind, C. Brown, B.L. Plymale, and C.O. Napper. 2000. Monitoring ecosystems in the Sierra Nevada: the conceptual model foundation. Journal of Environmental Management 64:139-152.

Keane, J.J. and M.L. Morrison. 1999. Temporal variation in resource use by black-throated gray warblers. Condor 101:67-75.

Keane, J.J. 1997. Wildlife. Pages 7.1-7.18 In Clavey River: Wild and Scenic River Value Review. USDA Forest Service, Stanislaus National Forest, Sonora, CA.

Sureda, N. and J.J. Keane. 1996. Observations of a pair of nesting Cooper's hawks in San Francisco, California. J. Raptor Research 30:247-248.

Keane, J.J. and M.L. Morrison. 1994. Northern goshawk ecology: effects of scale and levels of biological organization. Studies in Avian Biology 16:3-11.

Morrison, M.L., L.S. Hall, J.J. Keane, A.J. Kuenzi, and J. Verner. 1993. Distribution and abundance of birds in the White Mountains, California. Great Basin Naturalist 53:246-258.

Keane, J.J. and M.L. Morrison. 1990. Comparative use of eucalyptus versus native vegetation by wildlife on Angel Island State Park. Transactions of the Western Section of the Wildlife Society 26:44-50.

Ellison, L.E., L.S. Hall, J.J. Keane, and M.L. Morrison. 1992. Avian surveys at NAS Alameda for the bird-aircraft strike hazard program. Transactions of the Western Section of the Wildlife Society 28:48-58.

Hall, L.S., M.L. Morrison, and J.J. Keane. 1991. The distribution and abundance of birds in the White and Inyo Mountains of California: an update. pp. 203-245 In C.A. Hall, Jr., V. Doyle-Jones, and B. Widawski [eds.]. Natural History of Eastern California and High Altitude Research-White Mountain Research Station Symposium Volume 3. University of California, Los Angeles, California.

Morrison, M.L., M.L. Morton, L.S. Hall, J.L. Harner, and J.J. Keane. 1991. Population biology of small mammals in the Inyo-White Mountains, California. pp. 246-255 In C.A. Hall, Jr., V. Doyle-Jones, and B. Widawski [eds.]. Natural History of Eastern California and High Altitude Research-White Mountain Research Station Symposium Volume 3. University of California, Los Angeles, California.


Last Modified: Mar 28, 2013 02:54:07 PM