USDA Forest Service
 

Pacific Southwest Research Station

 

Pacific Southwest Research Station
800 Buchanan Street
West Annex Building
Albany, CA 94710-0011

(510) 559-6300

United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service. USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.

What's New Archive

Comparison of stand 9 tree inventory conditions in 1929 versus 2008,  showing stand 9 contains more trees in 2008 than in 1929 [Jan-06-2014]Seventy-nine years of monitoring demonstrates dramatic forest change - Long-term changes to forests affect biodiversity and how future fires burn. A team of scientists led by Research Ecologist Dr. Eric Knapp, from the U.S. Forest Service’s Pacific Southwest Research Station, found dramatic differences in forests today compared to historic conditions prior to logging and fire suppression. [Read the full news release at www.fs.fed.us/psw/news/2014/20140106_dramatic_forest_change.shtml]

[25-Nov-2013] Lowering stand density reduces mortality of ponderosa pine stands - As trees grow larger in even-aged stands, competition develops among them. Competition weakens trees, as they contend for soil moisture, nutrients, and sunlight. Competition also increases trees’ risk to bark beetles and diseases, and subsequently leads to a buildup of dead fuels. A recent study, led by Dr. Jianwei Zhang, research forester at the U.S. Forest Service's Pacific Southwest Research Station, considered if the onset of this risk could be determined. The study, which appears in the Canadian Journal of Forest Research, also considered if the relationship between density and mortality varies with site quality as ponderosa pine stands developed. [Read the full news release at www.fs.fed.us/psw/news/2013/20131125_PonderosaPineStands.shtml]

Tracy Johnson holds his U.S.D.A. Secretary's Honor Award and stands next to Agriculture Sectretary Tom Vilsack[12/13/2013] PSW researcher receives USDA Secretary's Honor Award - PSW Research Entomologist Dr. Tracy Johnson received a prestigious USDA Secretary's Honor Award in the category of protecting natural resources. Dr. Johnson led the Forest Service's international search to identify insect species for use as host-specific biological control agents against invasive plants in Hawaii. His 13 year effort culminated in the release of leaf gall-forming scale insects to help regulate the strawberry guava invasive plant species.

For more information on this subject, visit our topic area on Biological Control of Strawberry Guava in Hawaii.

Del Norte Salamander (Plethodon elongatus), B. Leonard.[28-Aug-2013] Woodland salamanders indicators of forest ecosystem recovery - Woodland salamanders are a viable indicator of forest ecosystem recovery, according to researchers from the U.S. Forest Service's Pacific Southwest Research Station. PSW Research Wildlife Biologist Dr. Hartwell Welsh and Garth Hodgson examined two species of woodland salamanders across four stages of tree development at Mill Creek—a disturbed old-growth redwood forest in northern California. [Read the full news release at www.fs.fed.us/psw/news/2013/20130828_Salamanders.shtml]

Students from Sierra High School in Prather, Calif.[26-Jun-2013] Students help with research on the Kings River Experimental Watersheds - Six students from Sierra High School in Prather, Calif. spent three days conducting research on the Kings River Experimental Watersheds. They helped install resin-bead lysimeters (water collectors) that measure nitrogen deposition and fluxes for a year across an entire watershed. This work helps PSW researchers evaluate the impact of air pollution on the forest and soils and understand how forests are using nutrients. The students also learned about watershed condition, air pollution and Yosemite toad monitoring. This is the second consecutive year that staff from PSW-Fresno has hosted students through the school's Environmental Adventures program, a vocational training for environmental sciences which was funded by the U.S. Forest Service.

Fisher in Oak cavity, Zane Miller.[26-Jun-2013] Illegal marijuana grows threaten fishers in the southern Sierra Nevada - Rat poison used on illegal marijuana grows is killing fishers in the southern Sierra Nevada, according to a recent study conducted by a team of scientists from the U.S. Forest Service's Pacific Southwest Research Station (PSW), University of California, Davis, University of California, Berkeley, and the Integral Ecology Research Center. [Read the full news release at www.fs.fed.us/psw/news/2013/20130626_Fishers.shtml]

Hawaii Youth Conservation Corps team members planting native species in Pu‘u Wa'awa'a. (Photo:  Elliott Parsons) [20-May-2013] Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry honored for work with youth - The U.S. Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station's Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry (IPIF) will receive a 2013 Site of the Year Award from Kupu, a Honolulu, Hawaiʻi-based nonprofit community organization, for its conservation education work with Hawaiian youth. IPIF has hosted members from Kupu's Hawaiʻi Youth Conservation Corps (HYCC) and AmeriCorps programs for the past three years. [Read the full news release]

[10-May-2013] The Richmond Edible Forest Project is a joint venture between the USDA Forest Service's Pacific Southwest Research Station and the Urban Tilth of West Contra Costa County, Calif., a nonprofit agency. The project helps engage underserved youth, who learn how to install edible forests -- or gardens -- in Richmond parks and school areas. (Photo courtesy of Urban Tilth)U.S. Forest Service and partners fund edible forest project in Richmond, Calif. Urban youth in Richmond, Calif. will get more opportunities to spend time outdoors and learn about plants and trees, thanks to a $30,000 Forest Service grant and a $93,000 matching partner contribution, which will fund the Richmond Edible Forest project.

The money will be used to provide conservation education to 700 underserved youth through field trips, camping excursions, and opportunities to install three edible forests or gardens in Richmond parks and school areas. The project is a partnership between the U.S. Forest Service's Pacific Southwest Research Station, Urban Tilth, and the City of Richmond. [Read the full news release]

[23-Apr-2013] Devils Postpile columnal basalt formation.Air pollution diminishing air quality at Devils Postpile National Monument—Air pollution from wildland fires and urban and agricultural areas in California is diminishing air quality at Devils Postpile National Monument, according to a recent study published in the journal Atmospheric Environment. [Read the full news release]

[08-Mar-2013] Barbara Weber.Celebrating Women's History Month - As the oldest of 11 children, Barbara C. Weber is accustomed to being the "first." With top family ranking comes responsibility, and Weber had plenty of it. Growing up on her family's 160-acre dairy farm in Bloomington, Wis., Weber, along with her siblings, helped clean the barn, pick up eggs, herd the cows and take care of the sheep, pigs and chickens. Taking a break from her chores, Weber enjoyed exploring the critters—snails, turtles and fish—that lived in the pond and creek on the farm's back pasture. Her innate curiosity and connection to nature led to her love of science. [Read more at the FS national website.]

[07-Mar-2013] All trees are not equal: Tips for tree selection - California Arbor Week, March 7-14, is a great time to think about all of the benefits that trees bring to us and our communities. Trees filter harmful pollutants from the air, mitigate climate change by storing carbon dioxide, reduce energy costs by providing shade, and lower greenhouse gas emissions. So, consider planting a tree on your property, or in your community. Pacific Southwest Station research forester Dr. Greg McPherson provides some helpful tips on how to select and plant the tree that’s best for you. [read the blog at http://investfromthegroundup.org/all-trees-are-not-equal-tips-for-tree-selection/.]

[20-Feb-2013] Science synthesis to help guide land management of nation's forests - A team of more than a dozen scientists from the U.S. Forest Service's Pacific Southwest and Pacific Northwest research stations, universities and Region 5 Ecology Program recently released a synthesis of relevant science that will help inform forest managers as they revise plans for the national forests in the Sierra Nevada and southern Cascades of California. The three most southern national forests in the Sierra Nevada-Inyo, Sequoia and Sierra-will be among the first of the 155 national forests to update their management plans. The new planning rule requires the forests to consider the best available science and encourages a more active role for research in plan development. [read the full news release.]

[15-Jan-2013]Video: Strawberry Guava Biocontrol in Hawaii

U.S. Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station scientist Tracy Johnson talks about the use of biocontrol on strawberry guava in Hawaii. [Length: 4:25] For more information on this subject, visit our topic area on Biological Control of Strawberry Guava in Hawaii .

New Online Tool Estimates Carbon and Energy Impact of Trees - A tree is more than just a landscape design feature. Planting trees on your property can lower energy costs and increase carbon storage, reducing your carbon footprint. A new online tool developed by the U.S. Forest Service's Pacific Southwest Research Station, California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE)'s Urban and Community Forestry Program, and EcoLayers can help residential property owners estimate these tangible benefits. [read the full news release.]

[11-Dec-2012] Fire ResearchFire Research at the Pacific Southwest Research Station - U.S. Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station (PSW) scientists talk about their fire research conducted in California and the Pacific Islands. view the video

[21-Nov-2012] Caspar Creek Experimental Watersheds Celebrate 50 Years of Research - While international attention focused on the dismantling of nuclear weapons in Cuba and the formation of British rock sensation, the Rolling Stones, a major scientific endeavor was underway among the redwoods on the Jackson Demonstration State Forest, just south of Fort Bragg, Calif. In November 1962, stream water began to flow over two gaging weirs constructed on the North and South Forks of Caspar Creek. [read the full news release.]

[09-Nov-2012] New Study Shows Effects of Climate Conditions on Bark Beetle Outbreaks - A recent study by a team of scientists from the U.S. Forest Service’s Pacific Southwest and Pacific Northwest research stations, and the University of Idaho confirms the important role climate plays on bark beetle outbreaks. Based on three decades of bark beetle outbreaks in Oregon and Washington, the researchers developed a statistical probability model to quantify the contribution of various climate conditions, such as temperature and precipitation, on outbreak levels and to estimate expected amounts of damage to lodgepole pine forests (e.g. total area with beetle outbreaks). [read the full news release.]

[14-Sep-2012] Forest Service Announces New Director for California and Hawaii R&D - U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell recently announced that Dr. Alexander Friend has accepted the position as Director of the Pacific Southwest Research Station (PSW) in Albany, California, effective Sept. 24. Dr. Friend is currently the National Program Leader for Climate Change Research on the Forest Management Science Staff in the Forest Service's Washington Office. Prior to his current assignment, he served as the National Budget Coordinator for Forest Service Research and Development. He is a recent graduate of the Senior Executive Service Candidate Development Program. He has a strong background in science, was a project leader in Houghton, Michigan. at the Northern Research Station, and a professor at Mississippi State University in Starkville, Mississippi. Chief Tidwell notes that "Alex Friend's broad knowledge of science and Forest Service issues, as well as his political and business acumen, will position him well to lead PSW as their next Station Director." [read the full news release.]

[21-Aug-2012] FS Chief Tidwell presents check to Oakland's Urban Releaf.Urban Releaf Receives U.S. Forest Service Grant for Greening Projects - U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell presents on August 20, a check for $181,000 to Kemba Shakur, executive director of Urban Releaf, in support of the organization's greening efforts throughout the city of Oakland, California. Since 2003, the Pacific Southwest Research Station has applied its research to assist Urban Releaf on numerous urban forestry projects, including a multi-phased watershed project designed to reduce stormwater runoff and improve the quality of water entering San Francisco Bay; and a demonstration project using engineered soil to promote tree growth, reduce conflicts between tree roots and sidewalks, treat urban runoff and reduce potable water use in urban landscape irrigation. Urban Releaf, an Oakland-based urban forestry/environmental non-profit organization committed to the revitalization of communities through tree planting, garden projects and environmental education, will use the funds to continue work on these and other projects.

[09-Jul-2012] New Study Shows that Fuel Reduction Treatments Pose Little Risk to Forest Ecology A recent paper in Bioscience co-authored by USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station researcher Dr. Chris Fettig and scientists from six universities in the U.S. and Australia have shown that forest fuels treatments such as prescribed fire and mechanical thinning which are now commonly used to treat stands in order to increase their resiliency to wildfires, can, indeed, be implemented with few unintended consequences. The scientists analyzed a broad spectrum of ecological markers, detailing the effects of fuel-reduction treatments on vegetation, soils, wildlife, bark beetles and carbon sequestration, while relying heavily on data from the U.S. Fire and Fire Surrogates Study, in addition to other research. [read the full news release.]

[29-Jun-2012] Native Plant Restoration Not Enough to Maintain Tropical Dry Forests in Hawaii Protecting Hawaiian dry forests from invasive species and the risk of wildfire is an on-going challenge for land managers and scientists conducting research on the Island of Hawaii. It is commonly thought that removing the invasive species and planting native species will restore the land to its original state. However, in a recent paper published in Biological Invasions, Dr. Susan Cordell, USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station, Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry; Dr. Erin Questad, Cal-Poly Pomona; and Dr. Jarrod Thaxton, University of Puerto Rico found that it is not quite that simple. [read the full news release.]

[27-Jun-2012] American Pika and Climate ChangeAmerican Pika and Climate Change Video - The American pika has been thought to be the canary in the coal mine when it comes to the effects of climate change on alpine wildlife. Popular belief dictates that warming temperatures will push the highly temperature-sensitive animals upslope. In this video, PSW research ecologist Connie Millar talks about how the small montane mammals in the Eastern Sierra have actually shown to adapt to the changing conditions. view the video

[30-May-2012]PSW Excellence in Research Award Winners - The Pacific Southwest Research Station honors employees — Richard Mackenzie, Jonathan Long, Amy Lind, Amanda Uowolo, Mike Oxford, Julie Farmer — in five categories for their contributions to research at our Station. - [read more.]

[30-May-2012] New Report Examines Effects of Trees Killed by Bark Beetles on Wildfire - A recent report analyzing a range of published studies on the impact of bark beetles on trees in the U.S. and Canada provides a more complete picture of the effect of this destructive insect on wildfires. [read the full news release.]

[18-Apr-2012] A young person from Progress Ranch plants vegetables in newly constructed raised beds.Youth from Group Home Plant Community Garden - Forest Service employees from the Pacific Southwest Research Station and State and Private Forestry in Davis recently completed a three-month community garden project on Earth Day, April 22. [read more from the USDA Forest Service's Pacific Southwest Region.]

2011 PSW Accomplishments Report - Our natural resources research continues to be on the cutting edge across many disciplines as we strive to respond to the needs of current and future generations. [read the report.]

[09-Apr-2012] New Report Assesses Impact of Climate Change on Forest Diseases - Climate change is projected to have far-reaching environmental impacts both domestically and abroad. A recently published report by the USDA Forest Service's Pacific Southwest Research Station (PSW) examines the impact of climate change on forest diseases and how these pathogens will ultimately affect forest ecosystems in the Western United States and Canada. [read the full news release.]

[26-Mar-2012] Scientists Find New Way to Measure Economic Impact of Forest Fires - A team of scientists from the USDA Forest Service's Pacific Southwest Research Station and the University of Córdoba in Spain recently developed a new methodology that measures the economic impact of forest fires on timber resources. [read the full news release.]

[23-Mar-2012] Removal of Invasive Tree Improves Health of American Samoa Forests - Removal of the Tamaligi tree (Falcataria moluccana), an invasive and destructive non-native tree on Tutuila Island, American Samoa greatly improves the health of its diverse native forests, according to a recently published study appearing in the journal Biological Invasions. [read the full news release.]

[29-Feb-2012] Study of Wildfire Trends in Northwestern California Shows No Increase in Severity Over Time - Even though wildfires have increased in size over time, they haven’t necessarily grown in severity nor had corresponding negative impacts to the ecosystem, according to a recently published study appearing in the journal Ecological Applications. [read the full news release.]

[02-Feb-2012] New Web Site Shares Information About Deadly Tree Pathogens - Sudden oak death, Port-Orford-cedar root disease and other deadly tree diseases caused by Phytophthora species (pronounced fy-TOF-ther-uh) are threatening forest ecosystems worldwide. These microorganisms, which are related to algae and diatoms, spend part of their life cycle in soil or water but once they infect trees, they can kill them. A new web site, developed jointly by the USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station and Oregon State University, hopes to put knowledge and resources in the hands of scientists and land managers as they look for ways to fight these deadly diseases. [read the full news release.]

[23-Jan-2012] High-Tech Models Help Guide Restoration Efforts to Save Threatened Plants - A team of scientists from the USDA Forest Service’s Pacific Southwest Research Station (PSW) and two universities will begin research using sophisticated topographic models to identify areas within dry forests that have the most potential for ecological restoration. [read the full news release.]

[09-Jan-2012] New Research Helps Predict Bat Presence at Wind Energy Facilities - An interactive tool developed by researchers from the USDA Forest Service's Pacific Southwest Research Station (PSW) will help wind energy facility operators make informed decisions on efficient ways to reduce impacts on migratory bats. [read the full news release.]

[29-Nov-2011] U.S. Forest Service Arboretum Provides California State Capitol Christmas Tree - Past and present employees from the USDA Forest Service's Institute of Forest Genetics will reminisce about the tiny seedling they watched grow into a 60-foot tree when Gov. Edmund G. Brown Jr. lights the 80th Annual California State Capitol Christmas Tree on Dec. 7 in front of the State Capitol in Sacramento. Part of the Pacific Southwest Research Station (PSW) and located in Placerville, the Institute has donated a white fir to the state for the past 13 years. [read the full news release.]

[24-Oct-2011] photo: American marten, K. MoriartyFewer Marten detections in California forest linked to decline in habitat - The reclusive American marten is getting even harder to find in the Sierra Nevada, according to a study by a team of researchers from the U.S. Forest Service and Oregon State University. A new study at the Sagehen Experimental Forest found that marten detections have dropped 60 percent since the 1980s—a decrease that may be caused by a degradation of the wooded areas in which they live, researchers say. Their findings appeared in the current issue of the Journal of Wildlife Management. [read the full news release.]

[28-Sep-2011] Photo: Emerald BayTahoe Science - PSW has released the Tahoe Science Program Round 12 Request for Proposals. Please read the full announcement for instructions on how to submit a proposal. This opportunity is also posted on www. grants.gov.

Visit our Tahoe Science research partnerships pages to learn more about the program.

[16-May-2011] Foothill Yellow-Legged Frog Provides Insight on River Management - River flow fluctuations downstream of dams are often out of sync with natural flow patterns and can have significant negative effects on aquatic species, such as native frogs, according to a team of researchers. The team examined how altered water flows caused by hydroelectric dams impact the life cycle of the foothill yellow-legged frog (Rana boylii). [read the full news release]

Visit our Rana boylii topic pages to learn more about the research.

[03-May-2011] Tahoe Science - PSW is initiating 15 new science projects in support of the Lake Tahoe Restoration Act and the Lake Tahoe Environmental Improvement Program. PSW administers this competitive Tahoe Science Program with funds provided by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) through the sale of public lands as authorized by the Southern Nevada Public Land Management Act (SNPLMA). The current round of projects will guide research efforts in the areas of Forest Health, Watershed, Water Quality, and Habitat Restoration, Air Quality, and Integrating Science. [read the full announcement]

[22-Apr-2011] cover imageSources and Science: A Guide to Experts at the Pacific Southwest Research Station

The Pacific Southwest (PSW) Research Station carries out the research and development mission of the USDA Forest Service in California, Hawaii, and the U.S.- affiliated Pacific Islands. From the southern chaparral, montane Sierra Nevada, and coastal redwood ecosystems of California, across the ocean to the tropical wet and dry forests of Hawaii and the Pacific Islands, our scientists and professionals are dedicated to enhancing knowledge of complex natural resource issues and communicating this knowledge to society.

I invite you to browse this inaugural edition of our "experts guide" to meet our researchers, discover the diversity of the scientific work that we do, and see how our science is making a difference—today and tomorrow.

Deanna J. Stouder
Station Director

[08-Apr-2011] New Program Plants Seed for Local Hawaiian Students - Students on the Island of Hawaii will get an opportunity to learn about native plants, ecological restoration and environmental sustainability, thanks to a new program funded through the USDA Forest Service’s More Kids in the Woods initiative. [read the full news release]

[03-Apr-2011] Mangroves Among the Most Carbon-Rich Forests in the Tropics - A research team from the U.S. Forest Service's Pacific Southwest and Northern research stations, University of Helsinki and the Center for International Forestry Research examined the carbon content of 25 mangrove forests across the Indo-Pacific region and found that per hectare mangrove forests store up to four times more carbon than most other tropical forests around the world. [read the full news release]

[14-Mar-2011] New High-Resolution Carbon Mapping Techniques Provide More Accurate Results - A team of scientists from the Carnegie Institution for Science's Department of Global Ecology and the USDA Forest Service's Pacific Southwest Research Station (PSW) has developed new, more accurate methods for mapping carbon in Hawaii's forests. [read the full news release]

[30-Nov-2010] Photo: Emerald BayTahoe Science - The Pacific Southwest Research Station (PSW) received 55 proposals in response to a request issued September 3, 2010 for research in support of the Lake Tahoe Restoration Act and the Lake Tahoe Environmental Improvement Program. [read the full announcement]

[23-Nov-2010] U.S. Forest Service and Two Universities Team Up to Develop New Ecosystems for Hawaiian Forests - In collaboration with Stanford University and the University of Hawaii, Hilo, the USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station’s Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry will begin research next spring on developing "hybrid ecosystems"—a mix of native and non-native species—in an effort to create a sustainable ecosystem in tropical forests. [read the full news release.]

[13-Oct-2010] U.S. Forest Service and El Dorado High School Team Up to Hold Third Annual Natural Resources Fair - El Dorado High School students and employees from the Pacific Southwest Research Station and Eldorado National Forest will continue to spark an interest in resource management among more than 600 middle school students expected at the third annual Natural Connections fair on October 15.

Sixth- through eighth-grade students from Placerville and Sacramento will visit 30 activity stations that will teach them about topics, such as biomes, food chains, water, wildlife, fire ecology and safety, insects, non-native invasive species, recreation, timber management, and genetics. The activities will be led by about 90 El Dorado High School students, along with Forest Service natural resources professionals from the Eldorado National Forest and Pacific Southwest Research Station, and partners from American River Conservancy, California State Department of Water Resources, UC Davis Extension and El Dorado County. [read the full news release.]

[07-Sep-2010] Tahoe Science: PSW has issued a request for proposals for Tahoe science projects funded through SNPLMA Round 11. - This opportunity can be accessed through the Grants.gov website, which includes blank forms. To access the opportunity to compete for funding under this RFP, search for one or more of the following attributes:

Opportunity Number: USDA-FS-PSW-TAHOE-2010
Opportunity Title: Tahoe Research Supported by SNPLMA Round 11
Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA): 10.652 (Forestry Research)

The request for proposals closes October 27, 2010 at 4:30 p.m. Be sure to check back to this website and the Grants.gov opportunity for any updates prior to submitting your proposal.

Visit our Tahoe Science research partnerships pages to learn more about the program.

[11-Aug-2010] Carbon costs and benefits of fuel treatment - The amount of carbon stored in our forest ecosystem, mainly in living biomass and soil, is also to a lesser extent also in dead wood and litter. Understory thinning and prescribed fires reduce carbon stocks and produce emissions, but continued tree growth re-sequesters that carbon in approximately 15 years. Learn about the several carbon costs that should be considered when conducting prescribed burning or thinning to reduce tree density and surface fuel loads:

[29-Jul-2010] Prescribed Burning Helps Managers Avoid Soil Damage - In a study funded by the Joint Fire Science Program and the National Fire Plan, soil heating was measured during a series of experimental burns that compared several soil types and moisture contents. The study revealed that soil-moisture content greater than 20 percent by volume effectively quenched the heat pulse in a wide variety of soils. From these findings, a predictive model was presented that allows fire managers to identify fuel load and moisture conditions to avoid soil damage during burning.

[13-Jul-2010] Historic Critchfield Memorial Herbarium goes digital: believed to be the largest collection of pine specimens in the world. - The Station has released the online version of the historic Critchfield Memorial Herbarium. The website includes collection information as well as a photograph of each specimen. Many specimens in the collection date back to the early 1920’s and represent an important record of the development of the field of pine taxonomy. Many influential forest geneticists deposited specimens in the herbarium. The collection includes several holotypes and isotypes- specimens used to define a species. With over 4,000 specimens, it is believed to be the largest collection of pines in the world. [Read the full news release].

[01-Jul-2010] Bringing the woods to kids: the Richmond Edible Forest Project - The city of Richmond represents one of the most diverse populations in Contra Costa County. It also has a high poverty rate: more than 13 percent of the residents live below the federal poverty level according to a 1999 report published by the Urban Habitat Program in San Francisco. But the Richmond Edible Forest Project hopes to help change those statistics by teaching local youth how to garden and produce a healthy food source for themselves and their communities. [Read the full news release].

[22-Jun-2010] Summer day camps provide fun environmental education activities for Humboldt County youth - The city recreation programs of Arcata and Eureka are offering several week-long camps focused on natural resources themes such as wildlife, forestry, aquatics and fisheries, air and space, and renewable energy. Camp participants will explore their local environment, and learn about research and careers in natural resources. The camps are supported by a special program sponsored by the USDA Forest Service’s Pacific Southwest (PSW) Research Station and contributions from community partners. [Read the full news release].

Photo: Emerald Bay Tahoe Science:

The Pacific Southwest Research Station (PSW) is initiating 17 new science projects (see the attached announcement for the full list) in support of the Lake Tahoe Restoration Act and the Lake Tahoe Environmental Improvement Program. PSW administers this competitive Tahoe Science program with funds provided by the Bureau of Land Management through the sale of public lands as authorized by the Southern Nevada Public Land Management Act. The Round 10 projects will guide efforts in the areas of Forest Health, Watershed, Water Quality, and Habitat Restoration; and Air Quality and Meteorology.

Visit our Tahoe Science research partnerships pages to learn more about the program.

[19-Mar-2010] New Project Helps Land Managers Understand Interactions of Climate Change, Pathogens and Forests - Scientists synthesize information about interactions of climate change, plant pathogens and forests in a systematic and useful way in a new report for land managers titled "Review of Literature on Climate Change and Forest Diseases of Western North America." This project includes a companion on-line "Annotated Bibliography of Climate and Forest Diseases of Western North America." Citations and summaries for journal articles and working papers on forest pathogens and climate are retrievable by author, topic, species, or geographic area.

Read the full news release.
Read more about our work in Insects and Disease and Climate Change.

[15-Mar-2010] Tahoe Science: PSW has issued a request for proposals that will apply the experience and expertise of a research team to synthesize past research, monitoring, and other relevant scientific knowledge in developing products to meet management needs for a comprehensive approach to managing the nearshore ecology and aesthetics of Lake Tahoe. A blank template for proposals is available.

This opportunity can be accessed through the Grants.gov website, which includes blank forms. To access the opportunity to compete for funding under this RFP, search for one or more of the following attributes:
- Opportunity Number: USDA-FS-PSW-TAHOE-2010-NEARSHORE
- Opportunity Title: Tahoe Research Supported by SNPLMA Round 10: Nearshore.
- Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA): 10.652 (Forestry Research)

Visit our Tahoe Science research partnerships pages to learn more about the program.

[09-Mar-2010] There's No Place Like Home; Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frogs are further imperiled by their strong site fidelity to degraded sites - researchers Kathleen Matthews and Haiganoush Preisler found that site fidelity, the tendency to return to previously occupied habitats, is strong in the Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog. The research showed how cumulative effects of a changing climate and introduced non-native trout are negatively impacting the habitat of a species already extirpated from 90% of its historic localities, and will further stress frogs with strong site fidelity. Low snowpack levels causing lake drying and predation by introduced non-native trout is hampering the breeding success of this imperiled frog. A recently published study in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences titled "Site fidelity of the declining amphibian Rana sierra (Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog)" underscores the need to incorporate the site fidelity habits of this frog while designing restoration strategies for its continued existence. Learn more... read the full news release.

[01-Mar-2010]> American Pika are thriving in the Sierra Nevada and southwestern Great Basin - New research addressing climate change questions, a priority focus of the USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station, documents that American pika in the Sierra Nevada and southwestern Great Basin are thriving and persist in a wider range of temperatures than previously discovered. Results were recently published in a paper titled "Distribution and Climatic Relationships of the American Pika (Ochotona princeps) in the Sierra Nevada and Western Great Basin, U.S.A.; Periglacial Landforms as Refugia in Warming Climates," by Constance Millar and Robert Westfall in the February 2010 issue of the journal "Arctic, Antarctic and Alpine Research." Read the full news release.

[26-Jan-2010]2010 Request for Proposals for Sudden Oak Death/Phytophthora ramorum research - provides for approximately $500,000 to be awarded competitively in 2010. Through this Request for Proposals, we will fund research, nationwide and internationally, to increase the understanding of Phytophthora ramorum/Sudden Oak Death. Proposals are due on or before Wednesday, March 31, 2010. Complete instructions for submission are provided on the Request for Proposals. For more information contact Susan Frankel, Sudden Oak Death/Phytophthora ramorum Research Program Manager at sfrankel@fs.fed.us or 510-559-6472. Learn more about the SOD Program.

screen shot of climate change short course[25-Jan-2010]PSW Scientist Earns Deputy Chief's Distinguished Science Award - Research paleoecologist Connie Millar is well-respected within the scientific community for her leadership in interdisciplinary research, including climate change research. She is also admired for her aptitude and eagerness to clearly communicate complex scientific findings to land managers. For these reasons and more, Millar will be presented the 2009 Research and Development Deputy Chief's Distinguished Science award during ceremonies January 27, 2010 in Washington, D.C. Read the full news release.

[22-Dec-2009]Tahoe Science: The Tahoe Science Consortium and Pacific Southwest Research Station have assembled a report entitled, "Effects of Fuels Management in the Tahoe Basin: A Scientific Literature Review." The report consists of chapters authored by research scientists that summarize the relevant scientific literature on vegetation responses to treatments, effects of treatments on future wildfires, soil and water quality responses, effects of wild and prescribed fires on air quality, and wildlife habitat and community responses. The report also includes a 6 page Executive Summary, an introductory overview of the context of fuels management in the basin, and an appendix describing several ongoing research efforts designed to answer key questions. Electronic copies of this report are available here: Effects of Fuels Management in the Tahoe Basin: A Scientific Literature Review

Visit our Tahoe Science research partnerships pages to learn more about the program.

Fisher M22 in the wild[18-Dec-2009] Forest Service Researchers Release Sierra Nevada Fisher Kit - An orphaned fisher kit released back into its native habitat after being rescued this summer by USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station's Kings River Fisher Project (KRFP) crew appears to be thriving. His successful reintroduction to Sierra National Forest is considered significant because Fishers are currently listed as a candidate species under the California Endangered Species Act; their status is currently being reviewed. (Read the full news release, read earlier release about the rescue.)

screen shot of climate change short course[14-Dec-2009] Adapting to Climate Change: A Short Course for Land Managers - A new climate change short course, available online at the Climate Change Resource Center and as a DVD, provides land managers with support for decisions about climate change adaptation. The self-paced course is a collaborative product of the Pacific Southwest Station and its western research station partners. Read the full news release.

Photo: Emerald Bay[01-Dec-2009] Tahoe Science: The Pacific Southwest Research Station (PSW) received 40 proposals in response to a request issued September 2, 2009 for research in support of the Lake Tahoe Restoration Act and the Lake Tahoe Environmental Improvement Program. Click on this announcement for more information about the types of proposals received and a list of the proposal titles. Approximately 9-13 of these proposals are likely to be funded next spring.

Visit our Tahoe Science research partnerships pages to learn more about the program.

[17-Nov-2009]Urban Ecohydrology Project Explores Impacts from Water Demand for City Trees: With a grant from the Urban Long Term Research Areas-Exploratory Awards (ULTRA-Ex), a program administered by National Science Foundation, social scientist Stephanie Pincetl will collaborate with an interdisciplinary team from University of California Los Angeles Institute of the Environment to investigate ecosystem transformation in cities, with a focus on water. The research will examine the human planted urban vegetation and Los Angeles water-use impacts on water supply from distant sources in a context of climate change. Learn more... read the full news release and read about Stephanie Pincetl.

[09-Nov-2009] Low-intensity prescribed fire. Photo by M. NorthResearchers model carbon storage and emissions after different fuels treatments: PSW scientist, Malcolm North, and collaborators sought to better understand how to manage forests with frequent fire regimes to maximize carbon sequestration and minimize emissions. They used a computer model and field data to study how different fuel reduction treatments, including thinning and/or prescribed burning, affect the amount of carbon stored and released in Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer forests with and without wildfire. The field data and model focused on tree-based carbon and quantified total carbon storage and emissions immediately following different fuels treatments and projected over a century. They concluded that a low-density forest dominated by large fire-resistant pines may be a desired stand structure for stabilizing tree-based carbon stocks in fire prone areas. Learn more ...

Last Modified: Jul 23, 2014 02:54:55 PM