USDA Forest Service
 

Pacific Southwest Research Station

 

Pacific Southwest Research Station
800 Buchanan Street
Albany, CA 94710-0011

(510) 559-6300

United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service. USDA logo which links to the department's national site. Forest Service logo which links to the agency's national site.
[image:] TreeSearch, links to http://treesearch.fs.fed.us/

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Science that makes a difference.

The Pacific Southwest Research Station is a world leader in natural resources research through our scientific excellence and responsiveness to the needs of current and future generations.

We represent the research and development branch of the USDA Forest Service in the states of California and Hawaii and the U.S. affiliated Pacific Islands. Our primary work occurs in California (the most populous state with the fifth largest economy in the world) and Hawaii (a strategic location in the Pacific Rim economies and tourism).

Our mission is to develop and communicate science needed to sustain forest ecosystems and their benefits to society.

What's new

Blog: How Does Wildlife Respond When Forest Management Helps to Reduce Wildfire Risk?
A small deer mouse. Photo by David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.orgForest managers in the western United States often face difficult choices when it comes to reducing wildfire hazards while also maintaining wildlife habitat in forests that have changed dramatically in the last century. A recent study published in the journal BioScience observed the effectiveness of efforts to reduce severe wildfire risk. The results demonstrated that forest managers could modify fire behavior and effects with treatments across a larger landscape to reduce catastrophic events like the King and Rim Fires. At the same time, small mammals and songbirds in the forest appeared to be mostly unaffected by the fuel reduction treatments.
[Read the full post on the USDA Blog site.]

News Release: Combined habitat degradation and climate shifts impact survival of the White-collared Manakin
A male White-collared Manakin near La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica.Researchers from the Pacific Southwest Research Station, Klamath Bird Observatory, and Costa Rica Bird Observatories spent 12 years studying the White-collared Manakin in mature and young forests along the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica. During the study, several El Niño and La Niña events resulted in very marked dry and wet annual conditions that allowed researchers to measure differences in manakin survival relative to climatic shifts. The results of the study represent the first published documentation of El Niño’s influence on the bird's survival.
[Read the full news release.]

Video: Science Perspectives - Air quality in Devils Postpile National Monument
Air pollution from cities moves through California’s Central Valley and the San Joaquin River drainage and affects air quality at Devils Postpile National Monument. Senior scientist Andrzej Bytnerowicz discusses the phenomenon and air quality monitoring research conducted in partnership with the National Park Service in a new video.
[See more videos on the Forest Service YouTube Channel]


Missed it when it was new? Browse the What's New archive.

[image-text]: Featured Science

Urban Forestry

The urban forestry initiative in Los AngelesMillion Trees Los Angeles: carbon sink or source?
Are urban Tree Planting Initiatives (TPIs) likely to be effective means for reaching local carbon dioxide reduction targets? Research forester Greg McPherson and partners determined that a large-scale TPI, Million Trees Los Angeles (now called City Plants), is achieving success in terms of survival, growth and performance.

New research evaluating tree species for climate adaptation
Climate change poses challenges for California, where an already parched region is expected to get hotter and, in its southern half, significantly drier. Research forester Greg McPherson and partners are identifying the resilience of different tree species to future climate exposure and threats from pests and disease in the Central Valley.

California’s climate change policies and programs
Station research and partner California ReLeaf's advocacy efforts have resulted in $17.8 million in cap-and-trade auction revenues for California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection's (CAL FIRE) Urban and Community Forestry Program in 2014-15, the largest one-year single-state allocation for urban forestry. Research forester Greg McPherson and partners published an article that traces the history of this effort.

[image-text]: Recent Publications
Cover image psw-gtr-247

Long, Jonathan W.; Quinn-Davidson, Lenya N.; Skinner, Carl N., eds. 2014. Science synthesis to support socioecological resilience in the Sierra Nevada and southern Cascade Range. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-247. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. 723 p.

Cover image psw-gtr-241

Busse, Matt D.; Hubbert, Ken R.; Moghaddas, Emily E. Y. 2014. Fuel Reduction Practices and Their Effects on Soil Quality. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-241. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. 156 p.

Cover image psw-rp-266

Hugh D. Safford and Kip M. Van de Water. 2014. Using Fire Return Interval Departure (FRID) Analysis to Map Spatial and Temporal Changes in Fire Frequency on National Forest Lands in California. Res. Pap. PSW-RP-266. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. 59 p.

Last Modified: Mar 26, 2015 03:01:00 PM