USDA Forest Service
 

Pacific Northwest Research Station

 
 
 
 
Pacific Northwest Research Station
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Green Cities Research Alliance
Urban Natural Resources Stewardship

Sustainable cities through science, policy, and action

THE RESEARCH AND SCIENCE TEAM

Dr. Dale Blahna

 

Dr. Dale Blahna
Research Social Scientist, Team Leader
USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station

dblahna@fs.fed.us


Dr. Blahna is a research social scientist and team leader with the Forest Service, Pacific Northwest (PNW)Research Station, based in Seattle. He has been with the agency since 2007, and prior to that was at Utah State University for 16 years, working on human dimensions projects related to outdoor recreation, public involvement, and community social impact assessment. While Blahna's work has mostly been in wildland settings, he now heads up a team to bring the Pacific Northwest Research Station's research into urban and urbanizing areas. He is co-leading the Green Cities Research Alliance; his work will focus on studies of environmental stewardship organizations, their goals and objectives, locations and activities of stewardship, motivations of participants, and implications for environmental sustainability and social well-being. He also oversees studies on the economics of urban forestry, and the role of partnerships in Forest Service management. More information


     

Dr. Kathleen Wolf

 

Dr. Kathleen Wolf
Research Social Scientist, Program Director
USDA Forest Service, University of Washington

kwolf@uw.edu


Dr. Wolf is a Research Social Scientist at the College of the Environment, University of Washington, and does research in environmental psychology. She has a joint appointment with the U.S. Forest Service PNW Research Station to help develop a program on Urban Natural Resources Stewardship. She has worked professionally as both a landscape architect and as an environmental planner. Since receiving her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan, Dr. Wolf has done research to better understand the human dimensions of urban forestry and urban ecosystems. Wolf's professional mission is to discover, understand, and communicate human behavior and benefits, as people experience nature in urban settings. Moreover, she is interested in how scientific information can be integrated into local government policy and planning. She is a member of the Environmental Design Research Association, the International Society of Arboriculture, a technical advisor on human well-being to the Sustainable Sites Initiative, a member of the Transportation Research Board national committee on Landscape and Environment, and the Washington State Community Forestry Council. Dr. Wolf has presented her research throughout the United States, in Canada, Europe, Australia, and Japan. More information


     

Weston Brinkley

 

Weston Brinkley
Research and Developmnet Program Manager
Forterra

wbrinkley@forterra.org


Weston Brinkley manages research and development with Forterra's Stewardship Department. Brinkley's research is centered on civic environmental stewardship and the exploration of its structure, benefits, and catalysts in urban areas, with a focus on understanding the volunteer steward experience. Goals include developing a stronger perception of the role of citizens and volunteers in environmental restoration and the importance of natural environment interaction in community building. Brinkley's other research efforts include the economics of citizen-based environmental restoration, the role of citizen participation in urban environmental stewardship and community planning, deriving a practitioner-based definition of urban environmental stewardship, and conducting a census of stewardship organizations in the Seattle area. Weston holds a Master's in Urban Planning with the University of Washington and his experience includes positions with the U.S. Forest Service, PNW Research Station, the city of Seattle, King County, and the state of Oregon.

 

     

Dr. Monika Moskal

 

Dr. Monika Moskal
Associate Professor, University of Washington
Director, Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis Laboratory

lmmoskal@uw.edu


Dr. L. Monika Moskal is an Assistant Professor of Remote Sensing at the University of Washington (UW), College of the Environment, School of Forest Resources (SFR), where she directs the Remote Sensing and Geospatial Analysis Laboratory (RSGAL) founded by her in 2003. She is one of the core faculty in the UW Precision Forestry Cooperative and is affiliated with the UW BioEnergy IGERT. She is also the Faculty Advisor for the UW-Geospatial Technology Club and Puget Sound American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) Student Chapter, the President of the ASPRS Puget Sound Region and past President (2005 and 2006) of ASPRS - Central Region (Vice-President 2004). Dr. Moskal’s and her RSGAL’s research goal is to understand multiscale and multidimensional dynamics of landscape change through the application of remote sensing, Geographic Information System and geospatial tools. The lab develops tools necessary to analyze hyper-resolution remotely sensed data by exploiting spatial, temporal, and spectral capabilities of the data. RSGAL work focuses on the application of high spatial resolution remote sensing (LiDAR, imagery) to investigate vegetation structure, specifically the utilization of leaf area index in heterogeneous canopies. Other RSGAL research themes involve multiresolution and multisensor data fusion, spatiotemporal object-based image analysis and geovisualization techniques to communicate research results. Our research has been applied to the following themes: ecosystem services and function, bioenergy/biomass, forest inventories, forest health, change analysis, biodiversity, habitat mapping, spatiotemporal wetland assessment, geostatistical analysis of prairie vegetation communities, urban growth, and forest fragmentation. More info

 

     
Dr. Lee Cerveny  

Dr. Lee Cerveny
Research Social Scientist
USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station

lcerveny@fs.fed.us


Lee Cerveny is an anthorpologist who has conducted ethnographic research throughout the United States, particularly Alaska, the Pacific Northwest, and the Southwest. Her early research explored tourism and its effects on human-resource interactions in coastal communities. More recently, her work focuses on: (a) partnerships, planning, and decisionmaking in federal land management agencies; (b) developing a human ecology mapping approach to understand people's connections with public lands and natural resources; (c) understanding values, attitudes, and practices of residents in exurban (peri-urban) communities. Dr. Cerveny’s latest work explores the role of natural amenities and public lands in resident decisions to move to exurban communities of the Puget Sound. More information

 

     

Lisa Ciecko

 

Lisa Ciecko
Plant Ecologist
City of Seattle Parks and Recreation
Lisa.Ciecko@seattle.gov


Lisa Ciecko is a Plant Ecologist with Seattle Parks and Recreation, managing city-wide forested parkland restoration as part of the Green Seattle Partnership. Previously, Lisa worked at Forterra, where her work included quantifying urban forest structure and associated ecosystem service values, as well as developing and improving restoration and stewardship tools. She received her Masters of Science from the University of Washington’s Center for Urban Horticulture, where she researched methods to improve conifer seedling survival at restoration sites in Seattle. Lisa has also worked on native plant conservation efforts nationally as a program manager and a crew leader with the Student Conservation Association.

 

     

Melissa R. Poe

 

Dr. Melissa R. Poe
Environmental Social Scientist
University of Washington
mpoe@uw.edu

Dr. Melissa Poe is an Environmental Social Scientist at the University of Washington, Washington Sea Grant Program and NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center. Melissa received her Ph.D. in environmental anthropology from the University of Washington. Melissa collaborates on a range of projects in coastal and terrestrial ecosystems on topics spanning from integrated cultural and health contexts of wild food systems, to informal economies and subsistence practices, to human wellbeing and social justice dimensions of natural resource management. Melissa draws from interdisciplinary approaches to do applied social science, including the use of political ecology, ethnoecology, cultural mapping, and institutional analysis methodologies.


     

Melissa R. Poe

 

David Kimmett
Program/Project Manager

Natural Resource Lands, King County Parks

david.kimmett@kingcounty.gov


David has worked for King County Parks for over 25 years.  For the past 5 years he has been a natural resources program manager focusing on forest stewardship and trails planning.  He spent 10 years in the Snoqualmie Valley managing natural areas and parks open space lands, and implementing habitat restoration and trail construction projects.  Born and raised in New Jersey, David has a Bachelor’s of Science degree in forest management from the University of Vermont.  He spent many years as a forestry technician with the U.S. Forest Service and was a self-employed forester as well.  David is a bit of a soccer fan and every four years he makes the pilgrimage to the world cup.

 

     
Geoffrey Donovan  

Geoffrey Donovan
Research Forester
USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station
gdonovan@fs.fed.us

 

Dr. Donovan has a bachelor’s degree from Sheffield University in biochemistry and a doctorate in forest economics from Colorado State University. He works as a research forester for the USDA Forest Service’s Pacific Northwest Research Station in Portland, Oregon (since 2001). His two main research areas are the economics of wildfire and quantifying the benefits of urban trees. More information.

 

     
   

Jenna Tilt
Faculty Research Associate & Instructor
Oregon State University
tiltj@onid.orst.edu

 

Dr. Jenna Tilt received her degree from University of Washington and has worked as a natural resource lands planner for King County, Washington. Her research focuses on understanding the interplay between natural environments, land use planning and human behavior.  Dr. Tilt’s research stretches across the urban-rural continuum.  She has explored the effect of canopy coverage and land use planning on human physical activity behavior in urban environments.  In rural areas, her research includes perceptions of forest management practices and local resident and planner perceptions of rural character.  Her current work includes: 1) understanding how natural amenities factor into residential location decisions and outdoor recreation choices; and 2) adapting urban green infrastructure practices for rural communities.

 

     
Jean Daniels  

Dr. Jean Daniels
Research Forester

USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station
jdaniels@fs.fed.us

 

Dr. Jean Daniels is primarily responsible for developing a program of work examining how economic analyses can be applied to help guide ecological restoration efforts. Federal, state, and municipal agencies, non-governmental organizations, and individuals participate in restoration activities for a variety of reasons, spanning from regulatory mandate to voluntary stewardship. Significant resources are allocated and utilized, yet the benefits and costs of these efforts are often poorly understood and difficult to quantify. This area of study is relatively new and she is working to foster greater understanding of the contribution that economics can make to guide restoration choices influencing how projects are chosen and prioritized, how benefits and costs are measured, and how success is measured and monitored.  The expected impact of this work is to develop metrics and tools to assist restoration professionals to allocate resources towards projects with the greatest likelihood of success in meeting ecological goals.

 

     
Clare Ryan  

Dr. Clare Ryan
Natural Resource Policy Specialist
University of Washington
cmryan@uw.edu

 

Dr. Clare Ryan is a natural resource policy specialist who looks at the ways that scientific information can be integrated into policy and management decisions. She studies the processes by which policies are made and implemented, ways to foster collaboration in management, and how to address conflicts that can arise when multiple stakeholders participate in decision-making. Before returning to academia, she spent several years as a scientist and manager at both the state and federal level. As a reflection of her wide range of expertise, she is the Director of the Program on the Environment and holds appointments in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs, School of Marine and Environmental Affairs, and School of Law. More information.

 

     
Tracy Stanton  

Tracy Stanton
Green-Duwamish Urban Waters Federal Partnership Coordinator
tstanton@me.com

 

Tracy Stanton brings nearly 20 years of work experience in environmental policy, most recently focused on the valuation of the earth’s natural capital and creating new funding mechanisms to increase investment in natural infrastructure.  Since relocating to Seattle in July 2009, Tracy has worked with a number of prominent northwest conservation organizations including The Freshwater Trust, The Willamette Partnership and Earth Economics. Previously, Tracy worked with the D.C. based non-profit Forest Trends and the Ecosystem Marketplace where her research led to the publication Payments for Watershed Services: An Emerging Marketplace. Tracy has deep experience working in collaboration with the public, private and NGO sectors on innovative approaches to advance effective conservation strategies, policy and funding options and she leverages this experience as the Ambassador/Coordinator of the Green-Duwamish Urban Waters Federal Partnership.

 

 


Contact for Information:

Kathy Wolf, Research Social Scientist; USDA Forest Service and University of Washington

 

 

US Forest Service - Pacific Northwest Research Station
Last Modified: Thursday,31July2014 at15:30:34CDT


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