Western Forest Transcriptome Survey
US FOREST SERVICE

WESTERN FOREST TRANSCRIPTOME SURVEY

is a collaboration to identify climate-related genes from diverse forest species. The study will identify genes and gene networks that are 'temperature responsive' and may contribute to climatic adaptation. Candidate genes for climate-related processes will be targeted for detailed study so that the genes responsible for climate tolerance and adaptability can be identified and managed in the forests of the next decades.


What Is A Transcriptome?
Transcriptomes represent the sum total of all gene expression in an defined tissue of organism. Variation in transcriptomes reflect the overall health and fitness of an organism, and can provide bioindicators of stresses from heat, aridity and disease.

What Transcriptomes Are Being Measured?
The Western Forest Transcriptome Survey is defining gene expression in economically and ecologically important plants, animals, and pathogens. These studies use massively parallel sequencing to identify transcriptome variation as related to temperature adaptation. Additional efforts consider forest pathogens and landscape genetic variation in mammals and rare conifers.

   Forest Trees and Climatic Adaptation
  • Aspen
  • Douglas-fir
  • Big Sagebrush
  • Sugar Pine

   Forest Pathogens
  • Tan Oak infected with Sudden Oak Death
  • Armillaria (Honey Mushroom)

   Landscape Genetic Variation
  • Mammalian mitochondrial genomes (Fisher, Wolverine, Pine Marten)
  • Microsatellite sequences for rare, threatened, and economically important conifers


Want to Learn More About the Western Forest Transcriptome Survey?
Informational summaries of our study are posted below; detailed findings are posted here.



Transcriptome analysis of spring needles from warm- and cold-adapted Douglas-fir identifies hundreds of differentially expressed genes.
Adaptive traits can be linked to gene expression changes through the use of common garden experiments. Transcriptome analysis of spring needles from warm- and cold-adapted Douglas-fir identifies hundreds of differentially expressed genes. Transcriptome experiments help identify genes and gene networks responsible for bud phenology in conifers.
Transcriptome analysis of spring needles from warm- and cold-adapted Douglas-fir identifies hundreds of differentially expressed genes.

 

Regional Contacts:

Pacific Northwest
Richard Cronn: 541-750-7291,
rcronn@fs.fed.us

Pacific Southwest
Jessica Wright: 530-759-1742,
jessicawright@fs.fed.us

Rocky Mountain
Bryce Richardson: 801-356-5112,
brichardson02@fs.fed.us