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Forest Service report spotlights fire risk for homes on the edge of wildlands


WASHINGTON, May 9, 2013 –U.S. Forest Service researchers recently found that about 90 percent of fuel reduction treatments on national forests were effective in reducing the intensity of wildfire while also allowing for better wildfire control.

report, “Wildfire, Wildlands, and People: Understanding and Preparing for Wildfire in the Wildland-Urban Interface,”

The report, “Wildfire, Wildlands, and People: Understanding and Preparing for Wildfire in the Wildland-Urban Interface,” synthesizes the latest research and provides examples of what communities in the wildland-urban interface can do to reduce their risk by becoming “fire adapted.” Aimed at community planners, the report also underscores the important roles that homeowners and local, state, and federal governments play in reducing risk and describes available tools and resources.

 

“The Wildfire, Wildlands and People report reminds us that people can and should take steps to protect their homes from wildfires,” said U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell. “Communities with robust wildfire prevention programs are likely to have fewer human-caused wildfires. In addition, fire intensity is dramatically reduced in areas where restoration work has occurred.”

 

Between 2006 and 2011, some 600 assessments were completed on wildfires that burned into areas where restoration work had taken place. In most of these cases, fire intensity was reduced dramatically in treated areas. Residents can reduce excess vegetation within and around a community to reduce the intensity and growth of future fires and create a relatively safe place for firefighters to work to contain a wildfire, should one occur.

 

From 2001-2011, an average of 85 percent of wildfires in the U.S. were human caused. The two areas with the highest percentage of wildfires caused by people are the East (99 percent) and the South (96 percent).


A smoke plume rises from the massive Waldo Canyon Fire near Colorado Springs

A smoke plume rises from the massive Waldo Canyon Fire near Colorado
Springs in June 2012. The fire would kill two poeople, leave a path a scar
of more than 18,000 acres, cost millions of dollars to fight, prompt the
evacuation of 32,000 people and destory 346 homes. It became the largest,
most expensive and destructive fire in Colorado.
(Ed Breec/National Interagency Fire Center)

The report is part of the Forests on the Edge project, which seeks to identify areas across the country where timber, wildlife habitat and water quality might be affected on private forests by factors such as development, fire, insect pests and diseases.

 

The project also seeks to understand where increases in housing density on lands adjacent to national forests and grasslands might affect recreation, wildlife, water resources and other important public benefits.

 

USDA has made a concerted effort to deliver results for the American people, even as USDA implements sequestration – the across-the-board budget reductions mandated under terms of the Budget Control Act. USDA has already undertaken historic efforts since 2009 to save more than $828 million in taxpayer funds through targeted, common-sense budget reductions. These reductions have put USDA in a better position to carry out its mission, while implementing sequester budget reductions in a fair manner that causes as little disruption as possible.


The mission of the Forest Service is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the nation's forests and grasslands to meet the needs of present and future generations. The agency manages 193 million acres of public land, provides assistance to state and private landowners, and maintains the largest forestry research organization in the world. Forest Service lands contribute more than $13 billion to the economy each year through visitor spending alone. Those same lands provide 20 percent of the nation’s clean water supply, a value estimated at $7.2 billion per year. The agency also has either a direct or indirect role in stewardship of about 80 percent of the 850 million forested acres within the U.S., of which 100 million acres are urban forests where most Americans live.

 

Fire Information

  • Firewise: The National Fire Protection Association's Firewise Communities program encourages local solutions for wildfire safety by involving homeowners, community leaders, planners, developers, firefighters, and others in the effort to protect people and property from wildfire risks.

  • Ready! Set! Go! :Take personal responsibility and prepare long before the threat of a wildland fire so your home is ready in case of a fire. Plan escape routes and make sure all those residing within the home know the plan of action.

  • Wildfire Smoke: Smoke from wildfires is a mixture of gases and fine particles from burning trees and other plant materials. Smoke can hurt your eyes, irritate your respiratory system, and worsen chronic heart and lung diseases.

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US Forest Service
Last modified May 16, 2013
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