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Catalog of Long Term Research Conducted by the Northeastern Research Station
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Fertilization: Used to Establish Tree Growth

# 44 Effect of Aerial Fertilization on Regeneration Stocking
  • Objective:
    1) To provide a vivid demonstration of the effects of fertilization on growth and development of young regeneration obtained after harvest cutting.
    2) To assess the impact of fertilization on production of wildlife browse and its crude protein content.
    3) To assess the impact on deer day usage.
    4) To determine the degree of nutrient movement into stream water and its effect on stream fauna.
  • Objective:
    • Substudy 1: To evaluate the effects of converting a hardwood stand to Norway spruce on quality, quantity, and timing of streamflow.
    • Substudy 2: To determine the effect of each cutting-practice level on water quality and quantity
    • Substudy 3: A) To provide biomass information and to study plant succession and hydrologic performance under natural revegetation of an area recovering from intensive use of herbicides. B) To measure the effects of managing portions of a watershed with a selective herbicide on the quality, quantity, and timing of streamflow.
    • Substudy 4: A) To determine the effects of a dense road network on stream chemistry from a 150-acre watershed. B) To determine the effects of a dense road network plus an intensive harvest operation on stream chemistry. C) To determine changes in watershed hydrology including annual water yield, peakflow rates, and stormflow volumes.
    • Substudy 5: To determine changes in soil chemistry, soil leachate chemistry, and streamflow chemistry resulting from increased application of nitrogen and sulfer.
    • Substudy 6: A) To determine the effects of intensive mechanical site preparation on the quality, quantity, and timing of streamflow. B) To evaluate the effectiveness of mechanical site preparation on the growth and survival of planted Japanese Larch. C) To obtain information on the effects of mechanical site preparation in modifying acid deposition effects.
    • Substudy 7: To measure the effects of fertilization on the quantity, timing and quality of streamflow from a forest watershed.
    • Substudy 8: To investigate changes in selected chemical properties of water as it passes through the land phase of the hydrologic cycle and to determine the dynamic changes in stream water quality during storm events.
    • Substudy 9: A) To evaluate the effects of applying agriculture ground limestone to the riparian zone of a forested watershed on streamwater and soil chemistry. B) To obtain invertebrate populations data to evaluate biological change that may occur as a result of the liming treatment.
    • Substudy 10: To determine the effect of forest fertilization on the water quality and the hydrologic balance of a forested basin.
    • Substudy 11: To determine what influences non-research timber harvesting methods (particularly clearcutting) have on water quality and to compare these influences to experimental results from the Fernow Experimental Forest and elsewhere.
    • Substudy 12: To provide quantitative information on natural water quality characteristics from an undisturbed forested watershed in order to provide benchmark data against which water quality data from treated areas can be compared.
  • Objective:
    • Substudy 1: To identify factors affecting precipitation pH.
    • Substudy 2: A) To determine the effects of a dense road network on stream chemistry from a 150-acre watershed. B) To determine the effects of a dense road network plus an intensive harvest operation on stream chemistry. C) To determine changes in watershed hydrology including annual water yield, peakflow rates, and stormflow volumes.
    • Substudy 3: To determine changes in soil chemistry, soil leachate chemistry, and streamflow chemistry resulting from increased application of nitrogen and sulfer.
    • Substudy 4: To investigate changes in selected chemical properties of water as it passes through the land phase of the hydrologic cycle and to determine the dynamic changes in stream water quality during storm events.

  

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