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Go to:2. Large Area Comparisons of Different Intensities of Even-age Management in Appalachian Hardwood Forestsy
 
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Catalog of Long Term Research Conducted by the Northeastern Research Station

Catalog #1

Title Large Area Comparisons of Forest Management Practices in Appalachian Forest Types
To determine the effects of different forest management systems for different site-quality classes on: a) yield and growth of the stands in terms of board feet, cubic feet, and basal area, b) species composition, and c) timber quality.
1950
expected to continue
Fernow Experimental Forest. Originally, areas were well-stocked and presently have no history of cuts or burns for at least 25 years. Most of the growing stock originated from second growth central Appalachian hardwoods that were 45-50 years old. Some residuals were present from the 1905-1910 logging activities. Study areas were laid out in mountainous terrain on the basis of site quality. The 3 site qualities included 1 from each of the following oak site indices: 80, 70, 60. Camera point surveys were used to identify the study areas.
Each of 3 silvicultural programs was replicated twice by 3 site qualities for a total of 18 sites plus 3 control areas (1 for each site index). Overall total of 21 sites.
100%
Prior to the first cut, 100% inventory was made of all trees >5.0" d.b.h. (by 2" classes). 
    3 silvicultural programs: 1) Diameter-limit cut, 2) uneven-age management, 3) patch cutting. 
    3 site qualities: 80 (75-89), 70 (65-74), 60 (55-64).
Diameter-limit cut: cut and removed all trees and felled all culls >17.0" d.b.h. 
    S.I. 80: 
    27 acres on 15-yr. cutting cycle; initially cut 1957 
    81 acres on 15-yr. Cutting cycle; initially cut 1953 
    S.I. 70:
    34 acres on 15-yr. Cutting cycle; initially cut 1950 
    53 acres on 15-yr. Cutting cycle; initially cut 1953 
    S.I. 60:
    12 acres on 20-yr. Cutting cycle; initially cut 1957 
    28 acres on 20-yr. Cutting cycle; initially cut 1952
Uneven-age Management: Single-tree selection harvests were made according to residual stand goals to produce sawtimber (no trees <11.0" d.b.h. are felled). 
    S.I. 80: 
    78 acres on 10-yr. Cutting cycle; initially cut 1957 
    25 acres on 10-yr. Cutting cycle; initially cut 1951 
    S.I. 70:
    34 acres on 10-yr. Cutting cycle; initially cut 1951 
    20 acres on 10-yr. Cutting cycle; initially cut 1954 
    S.I. 60: 
    12 acres on 15-yr. Cutting cycle; initially cut 1957
    11 acres on 15-yr. Cutting cycle; initially cut 1956
Patch Cutting: Openings ~ 150' in diameter (0.4 acre) were created under tree selection cutting (trees >5.0" d.b.h. were cut) to maintain a minimum of 80 square feet of basal area in trees >5.0" d.b.h. for indices of 80 and 70 while 65 square feet was maintained for site index 60.
    S.I. 80: 
    29 acres (4.5 acres of harvest at ea. cut) on 10-yr. Cutting cycle; initially cut 1952; rotation age 65. 
    31 acres (4.8 acres of harvest at ea. cut) on 10-yr. Cutting cycle; initially cut 1956; rotation age 65. 
    S.I. 70: 
    23 acres (3.1 acres of harvest at ea. cut) on 10-yr. Cutting cycle; initially cut 1964; rotation age 75. 
    42 acres (5.6 acres of harvest at ea. cut) on 10-yr. Cutting cycle; initially cut 1952; rotation age 75.

    S.I. 60:
    45 acres (7.9 acres of harvest at ea. cut) on 15-yr. Cutting cycle; initially cut 1952; rotation age 85. 
    11 acres (1.9 acres of harvest at ea. cut) on 15-yr. Cutting cycle; initially cut 1956; rotation age 85.

3 types of field inventory: tree, sapling, and reproduction. Tree-grade inventories are arranged by d.b.h. class. Volume tables are constructed by species.
Independent: site quality, silvicultural programs/management systems including stand structure, cutting cycle, residual stand, size of trees cut, cultural treatment, road system standards, site capabilities.

Dependent: growth rates, timber quality, species composition, reproduction characteristics, costs and returns.

Data are visually compared to previously collected data. Accuracy assessments are completed after each data-collection period. Permanent employee continually supervises temporary employees. Tree marking guide used to maintain consistency is attached to Working Plan.
Raw: stand structure (as defined by Meyer's quotient or Q: the ratio of trees by successive diameter class) and grade, species, d.b.h., and number of stems available on DG. Species, d.b.h., And number of stems are in hardcopy. Data are downloaded to PCs for analyses.
Studies of Ecosystem Processes
partially 1994
Work plan: 1950 
Revision of Working plan: November 1966 
Revision of Working plan: February 1969 
Amendments to Working plan: 
    1 July 1970 
    2 September 1970 
    3 July 1971 
    4 August 1972 
    5 November 1972 
    6 September 1973 
The above are office reports of U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, Parsons, WV.

Miller, G.W. And Smith, H.C. 1991. Comparing partial cutting practices in central Appalachian hardwoods. In: McCorwick, L.H.and Gottschalk, K.W., eds. Proceedings, 8th central hardwood conference; 1991 March 4-6; University Park, PA. Gen. Tech. rep. NE-148. Radnor, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. 105-119.

As of 1969: ~40 manuscripts were prepared after 20 years of this large area research.

Thomas Schuler,  USDA Forest Service,  P.O. Box 404, Parsons WV 26287. (304) 478-2000 ext. 110.
none

 

  

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