Link to the US Forest Service

2005 BIRD CONSERVATION AWARDS


Research and Management Partnership Award

Kirtland's Warbler Research and Training Program

The Kirtland’s Warbler Research and Training Program addresses the conservation needs of this migratory, endangered species throughout its range in the Bahamas and the U.S

Forest Service Partners :

Partners

The Kirtland’s Warbler Research and Training Program is a partnership that pioneers bird conservation by addressing all the conservation needs of a migratory, endangered species throughout its range in the Bahamas and the U.S. The partnership draws on the collaboration of scientists, land managers, governments, conservation organizations, communities, students and educators across international boundaries. Building local capacity in the Bahamas is the surest way to strengthen conservation there. To that end, more than eight local college students have been trained in field conservation. The students worked with researchers to band more than 80 Kirtland’s warblers and to radio-track 12 individuals. Further, blood samples and radioisotope work are being completed on the birds. This work yields essential habitat use information. In Michigan as well, the work and the partnerships continue to grow. Successful efforts have been made to restore warbler breeding habitat and to control the cowbird which competes with the warbler.


Back to top


International Cooperation Award

Western Boreal Forest Initiative

Forest Service Partners :

 

Partners

The boreal forest of Alaska and Canada supports one of every three birds in North America —a staggering total of over three billion birds. Up to forty percent of North America ’s waterfowl depend upon the 1.8 million square miles of this forest for their survival, including the lesser scaup, wigeon, scoters, and many land birds. However, the area is experiencing intensive development pressures. Underground deposits in NW Alberta hold 330 billion barrels of recoverable oil. Other pressures are increasing including the logging, agricultural, mining and transportation industries.

The Forest Service, Ducks Unlimited Canada and Ducks Unlimited US have worked together to focus on developing conservation strategies for sustainable resources development while protecting migratory birds. Over 20 research projects on wetland hydrology, waterfowl ecology, riparian management, bird and wetland inventories are underway. The results are encouraging: 100 million acres of bird habitat have been inventoried, 25 million acres have been protected through agreements with First Nations, and 20 million acres have been incorporated into forest management agreements with forest industry. This conservation partnership has been extremely successful in finding the solutions that balance industry and environment interests.


Back to top


International Cooperation Award

Conserving Grassland Bird Habitats in Mexico

Forest Service Partners :

Partners

Grassland birds of North America , such as the ferruginous hawk, mountain plover, and lark bunting, are the most threatened group of birds on the continent. Approximately, forty percent of the Great Plains have been lost and much of the remaining prairies have been degraded due to fragmentation. Since many of these birds are migratory, Mexico , Canada and the US must work together across the range of each species to sustain these birds. This partnership has developed new and vital conservation coalitions that share data, land management experience and ecosystem management perspectives. These coalitions also conduct projects on the ground together. This increased communication and sharing of success stories has led to improved land management practices—by government programs, private landowners and mining operations—all to the benefit of birds. The sweeping loss of natural grasslands across North America makes the remaining grasslands—many of them part of the Forest Service National Grasslands system—all that much more important. Specific achievements include completed inventories for bird populations, prairie dogs, and habitat for the Janos and La Soledad grasslands of Mexico , both very important winter sites for birds from the US . Further, telemetry of ferruginous hawks has provided new and unexpected information on bird migration and conservation needs, leading to improved conservation. Overall, this unique partnership has succeeded in addressing the most important needs for North America ’s most threatened group of birds.


Back to top


Habitat Conservation Award

Southern Region Bird Conservation Strategy and Partnerships

Forest Service Partners :

Partners

The Southern Region, US Forest Service has developed and implemented an outstanding landbird conservation strategy. The first step was to find out which birds use the national forest system, and when they use them. Gathering that information has led to more than 5000 bird point count stations and, together with other work, has resulted in a significant database. The types of information captured include: bird presence, distribution, abundance, and habitat use. The Region’s 16 national forests, national grasslands and its many conservation partners all need and use this valuable data for designing land management to sustain these birds. Regional personnel have provided leadership for bird conservation joint ventures and key financial and technical support for Bird Conservation Regions. In addition, the Region has refined the regional conservation strategy, analyzed data, implemented projects on national forests,grasslands, and surrounding landscapes, and acquired key bird habitats. The Region has successfully incorporated bird conservation information into comprehensive national forest land management plans. Using the data gathered, the Region and partners have led the development of bird habitat relationships models—important for providing valuable information for land management options. Overall, the Southern Region, US Forest Service has developed an outstanding partnership which provides more and better data—and integrates these into land management data to improve habitat conditions for birds.


Back to top


Habitat Conservation Award

Ouachita Native Flora and Fauna Restoration

Forest Service Partners :

Partners

The Ouachita National Forest and its partners have advanced bird conservation through an integrated ecosystem restoration approach. The forest has been designated an Important Bird Area because of its national significance for the conservation of birds. However, it has been subjected to over 100 years of fire suppression. The result is that almost all of the understory vegetation—critical habitat for birds—had been eliminated. The Ouachita National Forest has put great effort into reversing these habitat losses. For the past 4 years, over 50,000 acres of forested wildlife habitat have been restored through prescribed burning and thinning. Research has been a focus of this work as well, particularly in the identification of bird response to habitat treatments. Outreach work by the Ouachita Forest has led to significant public support for the work. Visitors from 45 states have learned about the importance of restoring natural ecosystems. Other specific accomplishments of the partnership include: over 205,000 acres of fire-dependent Shortleaf pine/bluestem grass ecosystem have been restored which, in turn, fostered the re-appearance of understory vegetation. Over 68 species of birds have benefited through re-establishing early succession habitat and older forest conditions, including the red-cockaded woodpecker, prairie warbler, and northern bobwhite quail. Overall, the Ouachita National Forest and its partners have demonstrated a very successful approach to bird conservation through pioneering integrated ecosystem restoration.


Click here for the 2006 Bird Conservation Awards


Back to top


Forest Service Home| International Programs

Working for Bird Conservation | Spanish Version | French Version |
Program in Action | Partnerships are Key | The Importance of Birds |
Learn More About Bird Conservation | Bird Conservation Awards
Related Links
| | Contact Us

Copyright© 2006 US Forest Service International Programs
Legal Information and Disclaimer
Webmaster

Back to the Wings Across the Americas Homepage For an overview of the program in spanish For an overview of the program in French