Issue 40
December 2009

Enterprise Program Welcomes New Unit

Organization Development Enterprise became the newest unit on September 16th. ODE takes a systems centered approach to organizational effectiveness. Our offerings range from training for individuals and groups (Transforming Stress, Systems Thinking, and Leadership Development), to process design and facilitation, and multi-stakeholder dialogue – both face to face and virtually. Our organizational solutions include knowledge sharing and conservation strategies, strategic planning, and web 2.0 presence strategies.

Our current projects include conducting a social network analysis of the agency’s NEPA community, developing a NEPA community of practice, monitoring the R10 RO transformation, and providing communication support to the Coronado and WO Business Operations.

ODE is comprised of Toni Stafford of Leslie, AR and John Able of King City, CA. For information on how ODE can assist you, please contact Toni at tstaffordnewby@fs.fed.us.

Enterprise Program Update

As I went through FY09 performance reviews with all the Enterprise Unit Executive Officers, one common phrase which surfaced often was, “stepped it up a notch”. I continue to be impressed with the work all of you have been doing. Your work has been reflected in the client and employee surveys – a topic I discussed in the last newsletter – as well a number of other ways. Not the least of these ways is the growth of the program. Two years ago the program generated about $30MM in collections; in FY09 it was close to $50MM (see graphic below). Program wide our reserve level and order book is also quite robust. It’s really quite remarkable.

Originally 9 units, now 18. First year collections: $200,000. End of Fiscal Year 2008: $48.9 million.

As I went through FY09 performance reviews with all the Enterprise Unit Executive Officers, one common phrase which surfaced often was, “stepped it up a notch”. I continue to be impressed with the work all of you have been doing. Your work has been reflected in the client and employee surveys – a topic I discussed in the last newsletter – as well a number of other ways. Not the least of these ways is the growth of the program. Two years ago the program generated about $30MM in collections; in FY09 it was close to $50MM (see graphic at left). Program wide our reserve level and order book is also quite robust. It’s really quite remarkable.

In FY08 the program added four new Enterprise Units (EU) and all of them were in the black in FY08 and again in FY09. Then, in FY09, we added another EU. This unit, Organization Development Enterprise (ODE), came from within the program. It was a first. Prior to this happening our Steering Committee agreed with a set of criteria recommended by the Enterprise Unit Partnership (EUP). Chuck Myers, the Deputy Chief for Business Operations, also agreed to the criteria and sent them out under a cover memo. The addition of ODE now brings the number of EU’s to 18. Welcome Toni Stafford & Company! If any of you would like to get a copy of the criteria and/or to better understand the process please get with your Executive Officer (XO).

As the calendar year ends and we enter into the holiday season I want to wish you and your loved ones all the very best. Thanks again for the excellent work you are doing in advancing the agency’s mission.

Bill Helin, Director, Enterprise Program

My Reflection on Ten Years of Enterprise

By Bill Hay


Bill Hay, TEAMS Enterprise Unit Leader, will retire in January 2010.

When Merl Sturgeon and I partnered in 1999 to move TEAMS from timber measurements to project planning and implementation services, it felt like I had stepped off a cliff from the security of a funded position to the uncertainty of relying upon my skills to sell services to agency clients! But, with Merl’s attention to detail and my visioning and entrepreneurial skills, we found we had made a great partnership. When we played golf (not often enough), the golf course became fertile ground for brainstorming sessions creating new offerings and beginning our business planning. We learned how to run a business, maintain financial health, work with great employees, and network at all levels. Marketing, hiring motivated employees, working with clients to overcome concerns, collaborating with stakeholders and finishing projects that made a difference for the agency provided great satisfaction.

Merl and I were reinvigorated at the annual Enterprise Program meetings where all the owners (now, executive officers) and Steering Committee members assembled. We often met with Gifford Pinchot III, the gifted entrepreneur and motivational speaker, who provided the inspiration for Enterprise. The mood changed from one of strict competition to partnering when, after months without a program director, owners established a trade association called the Enterprise Unit Partnership. The network became cohesive as we, the enterprisers, overcame barriers and the immune system within the agency. We reveled in success as the agency accepted us in 2006 after eight years of struggle to show the significant benefit of the program to the agency.

The agency and our clients have tested the Enterprise Program and TEAMS, finding them of great benefit. With the success of TEAMS and the Enterprise Program, I hope I have left a positive mark upon the program and the agency. I will leave the program with mixed feelings of loss and joy in my contribution.

I Have to Take This Call

In today’s fast paced, instant communication workplace, cell phones are a necessity. But if misused, they can diminish face-to-face communications and become an office irritation. Taken from the Federal Occupational Health newsletter, Let’s Talk, here are some basics of good workplace cell phone etiquette:

Ring tone
The ring should be professional and subtle. Putting cell phones on vibrate or silent mode is preferable. However vibrating phones left unattended on desktops can be irritating.

Meetings
Cell phones should be off or silent during meetings. If you forget and the phone rings, turn it off without answering and apologize. In most situations, taking a call or texting during a meeting is a no-no and may give the impression that you are disengaged from – and possibly place less value on – the meeting itself. The exception: If you are expecting a critical call, let others know and set your phone to vibrate. Leave the meeting to take the call.

Incoming calls
A face-to-face conversation takes precedence over an incoming call. Let the call go to voicemail. If you are expecting a critical call, let others know beforehand. Don’t cut off the conversation with, “I’ve got to take this.”

Personal cell phone calls
Use discretion when placing and taking cell phone calls at the workplace – and in public. Take your call to a private area, keep it brief, and keep your voice low. Remember – when in doubt, switch to silent mode.

Got Fossils?
Fossil Protection of Federal Lands

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Created by ACT2, Potential Fossil Yield Classification (PFYC) system geodatabases for California, Oregon, and Washington will be used to target further investigation and field work by FS Paleontologists.

ACT2 Enterprise Team is currently working on a project to classify geologic bedrock map units based on the potential for the occurrence of significant paleontological resources and associated risks to these resources. This project classifies almost 8,000 geologic map units in California, Oregon and Washington.

In collaboration with other Federal agencies, led by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Forest Service (FS), the Potential Fossil Yield Classification (PFYC) system has been developed. The PFYC is based on the potential for the occurrence of significant paleontological resources in a geologic unit, and the associated risk for impacts to the resource based on Federal management actions. It will be applied in a broad approach for planning efforts, and as an intermediate step in evaluating specific projects. Created by ACT2, PFYC geodatabases for California, Oregon and Washington will be used to target further investigation and field work by FS Paleontologists.

The PFYC was originally developed by the FS in 1996. It was subsequently modified and formally adopted by the BLM. The system assigns bedrock units to one of five classifications based on map unit characteristics, including age, rock type and abundance of significant fossils.

On March 30, 2009, the Paleontological Resources Preservation Act became law when President Barack Obama signed the Omnibus Public Lands Management Act of 2009. This law requires the Secretaries of the Interior and Agriculture to manage and protect paleontological resources on Federal land using scientific principles and expertise. The new law affirms the authority for many of the policies the Federal land managing agencies already have in place for the management of paleontological resources such as issuing permits for collecting paleontological resources, curation of paleontological resources, and confidentiality of locality data. The signing of this law precipitated renewed interest in the Potential Fossil Yield Classification system that led to this ACT2-WO Geology project.

Final Streamline NEPA Offerings

Streamline is offering the Forest Service basic course in NEPA and NFMA, Forest Plan Implementation 1900-01, May 3-7 in Folsom, California. Registration is currently open, and that class is about 65% full (as of November 23).Those interested should apply soon. They can contact Kelly Fike at kfike@fs.fed.us or 916.640.1280.

Streamline is also offering two advanced NEPA shortcourses in the FPI Toolbox series, Module 3 - "Issues & Alternatives" and Module 4 - "Effect in EAs," April 20-22, in Folsom. The prerequisite is FPI 1900-01. Contact Kelly regarding registration for either shortcourse.

From the Editor

Enterprising People is a bi-monthly newsletter focusing on Enterprise teams and their partners. Partners and Enterprisers are encouraged to share topics and ideas or join our electronic mailing list by contacting editor Kristi Bray at kabray@fs.fed.us. If you’re interested in contributing to the nextissue, please send your submissions by February 19, 2010.


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