Index of Species Information

SPECIES:  Carex concinna


Introductory

SPECIES: Carex concinna
AUTHORSHIP AND CITATION : Walsh, Roberta A. 1994. Carex concinna. In: Fire Effects Information System, [Online]. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory (Producer). Available: http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/ [].

ABBREVIATION : CARCOC SYNONYMS : NO-ENTRY SCS PLANT CODE : CACO10 COMMON NAMES : low northern sedge TAXONOMY : The currently accepted scientific name of low northern sedge is Carex concinna R. Br. [5,8,9]. It is in the family Cyperaceae. There are no accepted infrataxa. LIFE FORM : Graminoid FEDERAL LEGAL STATUS : No special status OTHER STATUS : NO-ENTRY


DISTRIBUTION AND OCCURRENCE

SPECIES: Carex concinna
GENERAL DISTRIBUTION : Low northern sedge occurs from Newfoundland and Quebec west to Alaska [5,9]. From Quebec it extends south to northern Michigan and northeastern Wisconsin [5,7]. From Alaska it extends south to Oregon and then east to South Dakota and Colorado [1,7,8,9]. ECOSYSTEMS : FRES10 White - red - jack pine FRES18 Maple - beech - birch FRES19 Aspen - birch FRES20 Douglas-fir FRES21 Ponderosa pine FRES23 Fir - spruce FRES44 Alpine STATES : AK CO ID MI MT ND OR SD WA WI WY AB BC MB NB NF NT ON PQ SK YT BLM PHYSIOGRAPHIC REGIONS : 1 Northern Pacific Border 2 Cascade Mountains 8 Northern Rocky Mountains 9 Middle Rocky Mountains 10 Wyoming Basin 11 Southern Rocky Mountains 15 Black Hills Uplift 16 Upper Missouri Basin and Broken Lands KUCHLER PLANT ASSOCIATIONS : K012 Douglas-fir forest K015 Western spruce - fir forest K017 Black Hills pine forest K018 Pine - Douglas-fir forest K052 Alpine meadows and barren K095 Great Lakes pine forest K106 Northern hardwoods K107 Northern hardwoods - fir forest SAF COVER TYPES : 237 Interior ponderosa pine 244 Pacific ponderosa pine - Douglas-fir SRM (RANGELAND) COVER TYPES : NO-ENTRY HABITAT TYPES AND PLANT COMMUNITIES : Low northern sedge was not listed as an indicator or dominant in available literature. Low northern sedge in Michigan is found at the edges of northern white-cedar (Thuja occidentalis) and balsam fir (Abies balsamea) thickets at the northern ends of Michigan and Huron lakes. Associated species include bristle-leaved sedge (Carex eburnea), hairlike sedge (C. capillaris), twinflower (Linnaea borealis), and bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi) [15].

MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS

SPECIES: Carex concinna
IMPORTANCE TO LIVESTOCK AND WILDLIFE : NO-ENTRY PALATABILITY : NO-ENTRY NUTRITIONAL VALUE : NO-ENTRY COVER VALUE : NO-ENTRY VALUE FOR REHABILITATION OF DISTURBED SITES : NO-ENTRY OTHER USES AND VALUES : NO-ENTRY OTHER MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS : NO-ENTRY

BOTANICAL AND ECOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS

SPECIES: Carex concinna
GENERAL BOTANICAL CHARACTERISTICS : Low northern sedge is a native, perennial, monoecious graminoid [8]. It is loosely caespitose [5]. Culms are 2 to 8 inches (5 to 20 cm) tall [1] and triangular [8]. Leaves are mostly basal, five to nine per culm [9], 2 to 4 inches (5 to 10 cm) long, and 0.04 to 0.12 inches (1-3 mm) wide [7]. Inflorescences are both terminal and lateral and 0.12 to 0.28 inches (3 to 7 mm) long [5]. The achene is 0.06 inches (1.5 mm) long [8]. The perigynia surrounding the achene is obtusely triangular and 0.12 inches (3 mm) long [1]. Low northern sedge has slender, scaly, often long rhizomes or stolons [1,9,10]. RAUNKIAER LIFE FORM : Hemicryptophyte Geophyte REGENERATION PROCESSES : Low northern sedge sprouts from perennating buds at the base of the culms [8] and from rhizomes [10]. It also reproduces by seed [9]. SITE CHARACTERISTICS : Low northern sedge is found in forests [10], open woods [3], and clearings [9]. It occurs on stony, dry [8,10], often calcareous soils [5,9,10,15]. In the Rocky Mountains and Colorado Basin, low northern sedge is found in rich, peaty soils chiefly in calcareous areas at elevations of 5,000 to 11,000 feet (1,524-3,353 m) [9]. SUCCESSIONAL STATUS : NO-ENTRY SEASONAL DEVELOPMENT : Low northern sedge blooms in June and July in the north-central and northeastern United States and adjacent Canada [5].

FIRE ECOLOGY

SPECIES: Carex concinna
FIRE ECOLOGY OR ADAPTATIONS : Since low northern sedge can reproduce vegetatively [8], it probably sprouts from rhizomes after aerial protions are burned. Where thick tufts form, they may protect basal buds from fire-caused damage. POSTFIRE REGENERATION STRATEGY : Rhizomatous herb, rhizome in soil Tussock graminoid

FIRE EFFECTS

SPECIES: Carex concinna
IMMEDIATE FIRE EFFECT ON PLANT : Low northern sedge culms are probably killed by fire during the growing season. DISCUSSION AND QUALIFICATION OF FIRE EFFECT : NO-ENTRY PLANT RESPONSE TO FIRE : NO-ENTRY DISCUSSION AND QUALIFICATION OF PLANT RESPONSE : NO-ENTRY FIRE MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS : NO-ENTRY

REFERENCES

SPECIES: Carex concinna
REFERENCES : 1. Anderson, J. P. 1959. Flora of Alaska and adjacent parts of Canada. Ames, IA: Iowa State University Press. 543 p. [9928] 2. Bernard, Stephen R.; Brown, Kenneth F. 1977. Distribution of mammals, reptiles, and amphibians by BLM physiographic regions and A.W. Kuchler's associations for the eleven western states. Tech. Note 301. Denver, CO: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management. 169 p. [434] 3. Dorn, Robert D. 1984. Vascular plants of Montana. Cheyenne, WY: Mountain West Publishing. 276 p. [819] 4. Eyre, F. H., ed. 1980. Forest cover types of the United States and Canada. Washington, DC: Society of American Foresters. 148 p. [905] 5. Fernald, Merritt Lyndon. 1950. Gray's manual of botany. [Corrections supplied by R. C. Rollins]. Portland, OR: Dioscorides Press. 1632 p. (Dudley, Theodore R., gen. ed.; Biosystematics, Floristic & Phylogeny Series; vol. 2). [14935] 6. Garrison, George A.; Bjugstad, Ardell J.; Duncan, Don A.; [and others]. 1977. Vegetation and environmental features of forest and range ecosystems. Agric. Handb. 475. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. 68 p. [998] 7. Gleason, Henry A.; Cronquist, Arthur. 1991. Manual of vascular plants of northeastern United States and adjacent Canada. 2nd ed. New York: New York Botanical Garden. 910 p. [20329] 8. Great Plains Flora Association. 1986. Flora of the Great Plains. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas. 1392 p. [1603] 9. Raphael, Martin G. 1988. Habitat associations of small mammals in a subalpine forest, southeastern Wyoming. In: Szaro, Robert C.; Severson, Kieth E.; Patton, David R., technical coordinators. Management of amphibians, reptiles, and small mammals in North America: Proceedings of the symposium; 1988 July 19-21; Flagstaff, AZ. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-166. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station: 359-367. [7124] 10. Hulten, Eric. 1968. Flora of Alaska and neighboring territories. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. 1008 p. [13403] 11. Kuchler, A. W. 1964. Manual to accompany the map of potential vegetation of the conterminous United States. Special Publication No. 36. New York: American Geographical Society. 77 p. [1384] 12. Raunkiaer, C. 1934. The life forms of plants and statistical plant geography. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 632 p. [2843] 13. Stickney, Peter F. 1989. Seral origin of species originating in northern Rocky Mountain forests. Unpublished draft on file at: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory, Missoula, MT; RWU 4403 files. 7 p. [20090] 14. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service. 1982. National list of scientific plant names. Vol. 1. List of plant names. SCS-TP-159. Washington, DC. 416 p. [11573] 15. Voss, Edward G. 1972. Michigan flora. Part I. Gymnosperms and monocots. Bloomfield Hills, MI: Cranbrook Institute of Science; Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Herbarium. 488 p. [11471]


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