Index of Species Information

SPECIES:  Carex concinna


Introductory

SPECIES: Carex concinna
AUTHORSHIP AND CITATION : Walsh, Roberta A. 1994. Carex concinna. In: Fire Effects Information System, [Online]. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory (Producer). Available: http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/ [].

ABBREVIATION : CARCOC SYNONYMS : NO-ENTRY SCS PLANT CODE : CACO10 COMMON NAMES : low northern sedge TAXONOMY : The currently accepted scientific name of low northern sedge is Carex concinna R. Br. [5,8,9]. It is in the family Cyperaceae. There are no accepted infrataxa. LIFE FORM : Graminoid FEDERAL LEGAL STATUS : No special status OTHER STATUS : NO-ENTRY


DISTRIBUTION AND OCCURRENCE

SPECIES: Carex concinna
GENERAL DISTRIBUTION : Low northern sedge occurs from Newfoundland and Quebec west to Alaska [5,9]. From Quebec it extends south to northern Michigan and northeastern Wisconsin [5,7]. From Alaska it extends south to Oregon and then east to South Dakota and Colorado [1,7,8,9]. ECOSYSTEMS : FRES10 White - red - jack pine FRES18 Maple - beech - birch FRES19 Aspen - birch FRES20 Douglas-fir FRES21 Ponderosa pine FRES23 Fir - spruce FRES44 Alpine STATES : AK CO ID MI MT ND OR SD WA WI WY AB BC MB NB NF NT ON PQ SK YT BLM PHYSIOGRAPHIC REGIONS : 1 Northern Pacific Border 2 Cascade Mountains 8 Northern Rocky Mountains 9 Middle Rocky Mountains 10 Wyoming Basin 11 Southern Rocky Mountains 15 Black Hills Uplift 16 Upper Missouri Basin and Broken Lands KUCHLER PLANT ASSOCIATIONS : K012 Douglas-fir forest K015 Western spruce - fir forest K017 Black Hills pine forest K018 Pine - Douglas-fir forest K052 Alpine meadows and barren K095 Great Lakes pine forest K106 Northern hardwoods K107 Northern hardwoods - fir forest SAF COVER TYPES : 237 Interior ponderosa pine 244 Pacific ponderosa pine - Douglas-fir SRM (RANGELAND) COVER TYPES : NO-ENTRY HABITAT TYPES AND PLANT COMMUNITIES : Low northern sedge was not listed as an indicator or dominant in available literature. Low northern sedge in Michigan is found at the edges of northern white-cedar (Thuja occidentalis) and balsam fir (Abies balsamea) thickets at the northern ends of Michigan and Huron lakes. Associated species include bristle-leaved sedge (Carex eburnea), hairlike sedge (C. capillaris), twinflower (Linnaea borealis), and bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi) [15].

MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS

SPECIES: Carex concinna
IMPORTANCE TO LIVESTOCK AND WILDLIFE : NO-ENTRY PALATABILITY : NO-ENTRY NUTRITIONAL VALUE : NO-ENTRY COVER VALUE : NO-ENTRY VALUE FOR REHABILITATION OF DISTURBED SITES : NO-ENTRY OTHER USES AND VALUES : NO-ENTRY OTHER MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS : NO-ENTRY

BOTANICAL AND ECOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS

SPECIES: Carex concinna
GENERAL BOTANICAL CHARACTERISTICS : Low northern sedge is a native, perennial, monoecious graminoid [8]. It is loosely caespitose [5]. Culms are 2 to 8 inches (5 to 20 cm) tall [1] and triangular [8]. Leaves are mostly basal, five to nine per culm [9], 2 to 4 inches (5 to 10 cm) long, and 0.04 to 0.12 inches (1-3 mm) wide [7]. Inflorescences are both terminal and lateral and 0.12 to 0.28 inches (3 to 7 mm) long [5]. The achene is 0.06 inches (1.5 mm) long [8]. The perigynia surrounding the achene is obtusely triangular and 0.12 inches (3 mm) long [1]. Low northern sedge has slender, scaly, often long rhizomes or stolons [1,9,10]. RAUNKIAER LIFE FORM : Hemicryptophyte Geophyte REGENERATION PROCESSES : Low northern sedge sprouts from perennating buds at the base of the culms [8] and from rhizomes [10]. It also reproduces by seed [9]. SITE CHARACTERISTICS : Low northern sedge is found in forests [10], open woods [3], and clearings [9]. It occurs on stony, dry [8,10], often calcareous soils [5,9,10,15]. In the Rocky Mountains and Colorado Basin, low northern sedge is found in rich, peaty soils chiefly in calcareous areas at elevations of 5,000 to 11,000 feet (1,524-3,353 m) [9]. SUCCESSIONAL STATUS : NO-ENTRY SEASONAL DEVELOPMENT : Low northern sedge blooms in June and July in the north-central and northeastern United States and adjacent Canada [5].

FIRE ECOLOGY

SPECIES: Carex concinna
FIRE ECOLOGY OR ADAPTATIONS : Since low northern sedge can reproduce vegetatively [8], it probably sprouts from rhizomes after aerial protions are burned. Where thick tufts form, they may protect basal buds from fire-caused damage. FIRE REGIMES : Find fire regime information for the plant communities in which this species may occur by entering the species name in the FEIS home page under "Find Fire Regimes". POSTFIRE REGENERATION STRATEGY : Rhizomatous herb, rhizome in soil Tussock graminoid

FIRE EFFECTS

SPECIES: Carex concinna
IMMEDIATE FIRE EFFECT ON PLANT : Low northern sedge culms are probably killed by fire during the growing season. DISCUSSION AND QUALIFICATION OF FIRE EFFECT : NO-ENTRY PLANT RESPONSE TO FIRE : NO-ENTRY DISCUSSION AND QUALIFICATION OF PLANT RESPONSE : NO-ENTRY FIRE MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS : NO-ENTRY

REFERENCES

SPECIES: Carex concinna
REFERENCES : 1. Anderson, J. P. 1959. Flora of Alaska and adjacent parts of Canada. Ames, IA: Iowa State University Press. 543 p. [9928] 2. Bernard, Stephen R.; Brown, Kenneth F. 1977. Distribution of mammals, reptiles, and amphibians by BLM physiographic regions and A.W. Kuchler's associations for the eleven western states. Tech. Note 301. Denver, CO: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management. 169 p. [434] 3. Dorn, Robert D. 1984. Vascular plants of Montana. Cheyenne, WY: Mountain West Publishing. 276 p. [819] 4. Eyre, F. H., ed. 1980. Forest cover types of the United States and Canada. Washington, DC: Society of American Foresters. 148 p. [905] 5. Fernald, Merritt Lyndon. 1950. Gray's manual of botany. [Corrections supplied by R. C. Rollins]. Portland, OR: Dioscorides Press. 1632 p. (Dudley, Theodore R., gen. ed.; Biosystematics, Floristic & Phylogeny Series; vol. 2). [14935] 6. Garrison, George A.; Bjugstad, Ardell J.; Duncan, Don A.; [and others]. 1977. Vegetation and environmental features of forest and range ecosystems. Agric. Handb. 475. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. 68 p. [998] 7. Gleason, Henry A.; Cronquist, Arthur. 1991. Manual of vascular plants of northeastern United States and adjacent Canada. 2nd ed. New York: New York Botanical Garden. 910 p. [20329] 8. Great Plains Flora Association. 1986. Flora of the Great Plains. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas. 1392 p. [1603] 9. Raphael, Martin G. 1988. Habitat associations of small mammals in a subalpine forest, southeastern Wyoming. In: Szaro, Robert C.; Severson, Kieth E.; Patton, David R., technical coordinators. Management of amphibians, reptiles, and small mammals in North America: Proceedings of the symposium; 1988 July 19-21; Flagstaff, AZ. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-166. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station: 359-367. [7124] 10. Hulten, Eric. 1968. Flora of Alaska and neighboring territories. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. 1008 p. [13403] 11. Kuchler, A. W. 1964. Manual to accompany the map of potential vegetation of the conterminous United States. Special Publication No. 36. New York: American Geographical Society. 77 p. [1384] 12. Raunkiaer, C. 1934. The life forms of plants and statistical plant geography. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 632 p. [2843] 13. Stickney, Peter F. 1989. Seral origin of species originating in northern Rocky Mountain forests. Unpublished draft on file at: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory, Missoula, MT; RWU 4403 files. 7 p. [20090] 14. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service. 1982. National list of scientific plant names. Vol. 1. List of plant names. SCS-TP-159. Washington, DC. 416 p. [11573] 15. Voss, Edward G. 1972. Michigan flora. Part I. Gymnosperms and monocots. Bloomfield Hills, MI: Cranbrook Institute of Science; Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Herbarium. 488 p. [11471]