Index of Species Information

SPECIES:  Montia diffusa


Introductory

SPECIES: Montia diffusa
AUTHORSHIP AND CITATION : Matthews, Robin F. 1993. Montia diffusa. In: Fire Effects Information System, [Online]. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory (Producer). Available: http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/ [].

ABBREVIATION : MONDIF SYNONYMS : Claytonia diffusa Nutt. [4,5,7] SCS PLANT CODE : MODI3 COMMON NAMES : branching montia TAXONOMY : The currently accepted scientific name of branching montia is Montia diffusa (Nutt.) E. Greene (Portulacaceae). There are no recognized subspecies, varieties, or forms [4,7,11]. LIFE FORM : Forb FEDERAL LEGAL STATUS : No special status OTHER STATUS : The Nature Conservancy ranks branching montia as rare and/or local globally (G3) and imperiled to critically imperiled (S1S2) in the state of Washington [12].


DISTRIBUTION AND OCCURRENCE

SPECIES: Montia diffusa
GENERAL DISTRIBUTION : Branching montia is distributed primarily west of the Cascade-Sierra Nevada crest from British Columbia to northwestern California [4,7,11]. ECOSYSTEMS : FRES20 Douglas-fir FRES24 Hemlock - Sitka spruce FRES27 Redwood STATES : CA OR WA BC BLM PHYSIOGRAPHIC REGIONS : 1 Northern Pacific Border 2 Cascade Mountains 3 Southern Pacific Border 4 Sierra Mountains KUCHLER PLANT ASSOCIATIONS : K001 Spruce - cedar - hemlock forest K002 Cedar - hemlock - Douglas-fir forest K006 Redwood forest K012 Douglas-fir forest SAF COVER TYPES : 229 Pacific Douglas-fir 230 Douglas-fir - western hemlock SRM (RANGELAND) COVER TYPES : NO-ENTRY HABITAT TYPES AND PLANT COMMUNITIES : NO-ENTRY

MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS

SPECIES: Montia diffusa
IMPORTANCE TO LIVESTOCK AND WILDLIFE : NO-ENTRY PALATABILITY : NO-ENTRY NUTRITIONAL VALUE : NO-ENTRY COVER VALUE : NO-ENTRY VALUE FOR REHABILITATION OF DISTURBED SITES : NO-ENTRY OTHER USES AND VALUES : NO-ENTRY OTHER MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS : NO-ENTRY

BOTANICAL AND ECOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS

SPECIES: Montia diffusa
GENERAL BOTANICAL CHARACTERISTICS : Branching montia is an annual forb diffusely branched from the base with erect stems 2 to 6 inches (5-15 cm) tall. The basal and cauline leaves are alike and are 0.8 to 2 inches (2-5 cm) long. The inflorescence is a terminal panicle. Capsules have one to three seeds that are approximately 0.06 inch (0.15 cm) long [4,7]. RAUNKIAER LIFE FORM : Therophyte REGENERATION PROCESSES : NO-ENTRY SITE CHARACTERISTICS : Branching montia is found on moist sites [4,7]. In California it most often occurs in woodlands and coniferous forests below 3,280 feet (1,000 m) elevation [7]. SUCCESSIONAL STATUS : NO-ENTRY SEASONAL DEVELOPMENT : Branching montia flowers from May to July [7].

FIRE ECOLOGY

SPECIES: Montia diffusa
FIRE ECOLOGY OR ADAPTATIONS : Information regarding the ecological adaptations of branching montia for survival following fire is not available in the literature. Miner's-lettuce (Claytonia perfoliata), a closely related species, colonizes sites following fire by long-lived seeds that are stored in the soil. Miner's-lettuce also mass-flowers in the first postfire years, allowing for secondary colonization by on-site seed [9]. Branching montia often occurs in burned or otherwise disturbed confierous forests [11], and may have similar postfire reproductive patterns. POSTFIRE REGENERATION STRATEGY : NO-ENTRY

FIRE EFFECTS

SPECIES: Montia diffusa
IMMEDIATE FIRE EFFECT ON PLANT : NO-ENTRY DISCUSSION AND QUALIFICATION OF FIRE EFFECT : NO-ENTRY PLANT RESPONSE TO FIRE : NO-ENTRY DISCUSSION AND QUALIFICATION OF PLANT RESPONSE : NO-ENTRY FIRE MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS : NO-ENTRY

REFERENCES

SPECIES: Montia diffusa
REFERENCES : 1. Bernard, Stephen R.; Brown, Kenneth F. 1977. Distribution of mammals, reptiles, and amphibians by BLM physiographic regions and A.W. Kuchler's associations for the eleven western states. Tech. Note 301. Denver, CO: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management. 169 p. [434] 2. Eyre, F. H., ed. 1980. Forest cover types of the United States and Canada. Washington, DC: Society of American Foresters. 148 p. [905] 3. Garrison, George A.; Bjugstad, Ardell J.; Duncan, Don A.; [and others]. 1977. Vegetation and environmental features of forest and range ecosystems. Agric. Handb. 475. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. 68 p. [998] 4. Hitchcock, C. Leo; Cronquist, Arthur. 1973. Flora of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press. 730 p. [1168] 5. Kartesz, John T.; Kartesz, Rosemarie. 1980. A synonymized checklist of the vascular flora of the United States, Canada, and Greenland. Volume II: The biota of North America. Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina Press; in confederation with Anne H. Lindsey and C. Richie Bell, North Carolina Botanical Garden. 500 p. [6954] 6. Kuchler, A. W. 1964. Manual to accompany the map of potential vegetation of the conterminous United States. Special Publication No. 36. New York: American Geographical Society. 77 p. [1384] 7. Munz, Philip A. 1973. A California flora and supplement. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. 1905 p. [6155] 8. Raunkiaer, C. 1934. The life forms of plants and statistical plant geography. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 632 p. [2843] 9. Stickney, Peter F. 1993. Effects of fire on upland forests in the Northern Rocky Mountains. Unpublished paper on file at: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory, Missoula, MT: 3 p. [21627] 10. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service. 1982. National list of scientific plant names. Vol. 1. List of plant names. SCS-TP-159. Washington, DC. 416 p. [11573] 11. Hickman, James C., ed. 1993. The Jepson manual: Higher plants of California. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. 1400 p. [21992] 12. Washington Natural Heritage Program, compiler. 1994. Endangered, threatened, and sensitive vascular plants of Washington. Olympia, WA: Department of Natural Resources. 52 p. [25413]


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