Index of Species Information

SPECIES:  Lathyrus bijugatus

Introductory

SPECIES: Lathyrus bijugatus
AUTHORSHIP AND CITATION : Williams, Tara Y. 1990. Lathyrus bijugatus. In: Fire Effects Information System, [Online]. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory (Producer). Available: http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/ [].
ABBREVIATION : LATBIJ SYNONYMS : NO-ENTRY SCS PLANT CODE : LIBI2 COMMON NAMES : pinewoods sweetpea TAXONOMY : The currently accepted scientific name of pinewoods sweetpea is Lathyrus bijugatus White [5]. LIFE FORM : Forb FEDERAL LEGAL STATUS : No special status OTHER STATUS : Pinewoods sweetpea is a regional endemic [8].


DISTRIBUTION AND OCCURRENCE

SPECIES: Lathyrus bijugatus
GENERAL DISTRIBUTION : Pinewoods sweetpea is found in eastern Washington and Idaho. It is a regional endemic in Montana [5,8]. Occurrence in Glacier National Park: along Inside Road 1.5 miles south of Logging Lake Ranger Station [7]. ECOSYSTEMS : FRES21 Ponderosa pine STATES : ID MT WA BLM PHYSIOGRAPHIC REGIONS : 8 Northern Rocky Mountains KUCHLER PLANT ASSOCIATIONS : K005 Mixed conifer forest K011 Western ponderosa forest SAF COVER TYPES : 237 Interior ponderosa pine SRM (RANGELAND) COVER TYPES : NO-ENTRY HABITAT TYPES AND PLANT COMMUNITIES : NO-ENTRY

MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS

SPECIES: Lathyrus bijugatus
IMPORTANCE TO LIVESTOCK AND WILDLIFE : NO-ENTRY PALATABILITY : NO-ENTRY NUTRITIONAL VALUE : NO-ENTRY COVER VALUE : NO-ENTRY VALUE FOR REHABILITATION OF DISTURBED SITES : NO-ENTRY OTHER USES AND VALUES : NO-ENTRY OTHER MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS : Pinewoods sweetpea should be protected from damage due to road maintenance in Glacier National Park [7]. Pinewoods sweetpea is a poisonous plant [2].

BOTANICAL AND ECOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS

SPECIES: Lathyrus bijugatus
GENERAL BOTANICAL CHARACTERISTICS : Pinewoods sweetpea is a native perennial legume. It has slender rhizomes and grows 8 to 12 inches (10-13 cm) tall. The leaflets are 1 to 6 inches (2-15 cm) long; the tendrils are bristlelike. The bluish-pink flowers are approximately 0.5 inch (10-13 mm) across. The pod is 1 to 1.5 inches (3-4 cm) long and contains 7 to 12 seeds [5]. Pinewoods sweetpea is a nitrogen fixer [2]. RAUNKIAER LIFE FORM : Hemicryptophyte REGENERATION PROCESSES : Pinewoods sweetpea reproduces by both sexual and vegetative means [2]. SITE CHARACTERISTICS : Pinewoods sweetpea grows in open ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa)-western larch (Larix occidentalis) forests at low elevations in foothills and open parks under trees [5,7]. SUCCESSIONAL STATUS : NO-ENTRY SEASONAL DEVELOPMENT : Pinewoods sweetpea flowers from May through July [5].

FIRE ECOLOGY

SPECIES: Lathyrus bijugatus
FIRE ECOLOGY OR ADAPTATIONS : NO-ENTRY FIRE REGIMES : Find fire regime information for the plant communities in which this species may occur by entering the species name in the FEIS home page under "Find Fire Regimes". POSTFIRE REGENERATION STRATEGY : NO-ENTRY

FIRE EFFECTS

SPECIES: Lathyrus bijugatus
IMMEDIATE FIRE EFFECT ON PLANT : NO-ENTRY DISCUSSION AND QUALIFICATION OF FIRE EFFECT : NO-ENTRY PLANT RESPONSE TO FIRE : NO-ENTRY DISCUSSION AND QUALIFICATION OF PLANT RESPONSE :
The following Research Project Summary provides information on prescribed fire use and
postfire response of many plant species, including spreading dogbane:

Understory recovery after low- and high-intensity fires in northern Idaho ponderosa pine forests



FIRE MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS : 
NO-ENTRY


REFERENCES

SPECIES: Lathyrus bijugatus
REFERENCES : 1. Bernard, Stephen R.; Brown, Kenneth F. 1977. Distribution of mammals, reptiles, and amphibians by BLM physiographic regions and A.W. Kuchler's associations for the eleven western states. Tech. Note 301. Denver, CO: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management. 169 p. [434] 2. Dittberner, Phillip L.; Olson, Michael R. 1983. The plant information network (PIN) data base: Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming. FWS/OBS-83/86. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service. 786 p. [806] 3. Eyre, F. H., ed. 1980. Forest cover types of the United States and Canada. Washington, DC: Society of American Foresters. 148 p. [905] 4. Garrison, George A.; Bjugstad, Ardell J.; Duncan, Don A.; [and others]. 1977. Vegetation and environmental features of forest and range ecosystems. Agric. Handb. 475. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. 68 p. [998] 5. Hitchcock, C. Leo; Cronquist, Arthur. 1961. Vascular plants of the Pacific Northwest. Part 3: Saxifragaceae to Ericaceae. Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press. 614 p. [1167] 6. Kuchler, A. W. 1964. Manual to accompany the map of potential vegetation of the conterminous United States. Special Publication No. 36. New York: American Geographical Society. 77 p. [1384] 7. Lesica, Peter. 1984. Rare vascular plants of Glacier National Park, Montana. Missoula, MT: University of Montana, Department of Botany. 27 p. [12049] 8. Lesica, P.; Moore, G.; Peterson, K. M.; Rumely, J. H. (Montana Rare Plant Project). 1984. Vascular plants of limited distribution in Montana. Monograph No. 2. Montana Academy of Sciences, Supplement to the Proceedings, Volume 43. Bozman, MT: Montana State University, Montana Academy of Sciences. 61 p. [11656] 9. Raunkiaer, C. 1934. The life forms of plants and statistical plant geography. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 632 p. [2843] 10. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service. 1982. National list of scientific plant names. Vol. 1. List of plant names. SCS-TP-159. Washington, DC. 416 p. [11573]