Index of Species Information

SPECIES:  Lathyrus bijugatus

Introductory

SPECIES: Lathyrus bijugatus
AUTHORSHIP AND CITATION : Williams, Tara Y. 1990. Lathyrus bijugatus. In: Fire Effects Information System, [Online]. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory (Producer). Available: http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/ [].
ABBREVIATION : LATBIJ SYNONYMS : NO-ENTRY SCS PLANT CODE : LIBI2 COMMON NAMES : pinewoods sweetpea TAXONOMY : The currently accepted scientific name of pinewoods sweetpea is Lathyrus bijugatus White [5]. LIFE FORM : Forb FEDERAL LEGAL STATUS : No special status OTHER STATUS : Pinewoods sweetpea is a regional endemic [8].


DISTRIBUTION AND OCCURRENCE

SPECIES: Lathyrus bijugatus
GENERAL DISTRIBUTION : Pinewoods sweetpea is found in eastern Washington and Idaho. It is a regional endemic in Montana [5,8]. Occurrence in Glacier National Park: along Inside Road 1.5 miles south of Logging Lake Ranger Station [7]. ECOSYSTEMS : FRES21 Ponderosa pine STATES : ID MT WA BLM PHYSIOGRAPHIC REGIONS : 8 Northern Rocky Mountains KUCHLER PLANT ASSOCIATIONS : K005 Mixed conifer forest K011 Western ponderosa forest SAF COVER TYPES : 237 Interior ponderosa pine SRM (RANGELAND) COVER TYPES : NO-ENTRY HABITAT TYPES AND PLANT COMMUNITIES : NO-ENTRY

MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS

SPECIES: Lathyrus bijugatus
IMPORTANCE TO LIVESTOCK AND WILDLIFE : NO-ENTRY PALATABILITY : NO-ENTRY NUTRITIONAL VALUE : NO-ENTRY COVER VALUE : NO-ENTRY VALUE FOR REHABILITATION OF DISTURBED SITES : NO-ENTRY OTHER USES AND VALUES : NO-ENTRY OTHER MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS : Pinewoods sweetpea should be protected from damage due to road maintenance in Glacier National Park [7]. Pinewoods sweetpea is a poisonous plant [2].

BOTANICAL AND ECOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS

SPECIES: Lathyrus bijugatus
GENERAL BOTANICAL CHARACTERISTICS : Pinewoods sweetpea is a native perennial legume. It has slender rhizomes and grows 8 to 12 inches (10-13 cm) tall. The leaflets are 1 to 6 inches (2-15 cm) long; the tendrils are bristlelike. The bluish-pink flowers are approximately 0.5 inch (10-13 mm) across. The pod is 1 to 1.5 inches (3-4 cm) long and contains 7 to 12 seeds [5]. Pinewoods sweetpea is a nitrogen fixer [2]. RAUNKIAER LIFE FORM : Hemicryptophyte REGENERATION PROCESSES : Pinewoods sweetpea reproduces by both sexual and vegetative means [2]. SITE CHARACTERISTICS : Pinewoods sweetpea grows in open ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa)-western larch (Larix occidentalis) forests at low elevations in foothills and open parks under trees [5,7]. SUCCESSIONAL STATUS : NO-ENTRY SEASONAL DEVELOPMENT : Pinewoods sweetpea flowers from May through July [5].

FIRE ECOLOGY

SPECIES: Lathyrus bijugatus
FIRE ECOLOGY OR ADAPTATIONS : NO-ENTRY POSTFIRE REGENERATION STRATEGY : NO-ENTRY

FIRE EFFECTS

SPECIES: Lathyrus bijugatus
IMMEDIATE FIRE EFFECT ON PLANT : NO-ENTRY DISCUSSION AND QUALIFICATION OF FIRE EFFECT : NO-ENTRY PLANT RESPONSE TO FIRE : NO-ENTRY DISCUSSION AND QUALIFICATION OF PLANT RESPONSE :
The following Research Project Summary provides information on prescribed fire use and
postfire response of many plant species, including spreading dogbane:

Understory recovery after low- and high-intensity fires in northern Idaho ponderosa pine forests



FIRE MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS : 
NO-ENTRY


REFERENCES

SPECIES: Lathyrus bijugatus
REFERENCES : 1. Bernard, Stephen R.; Brown, Kenneth F. 1977. Distribution of mammals, reptiles, and amphibians by BLM physiographic regions and A.W. Kuchler's associations for the eleven western states. Tech. Note 301. Denver, CO: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management. 169 p. [434] 2. Dittberner, Phillip L.; Olson, Michael R. 1983. The plant information network (PIN) data base: Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming. FWS/OBS-83/86. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service. 786 p. [806] 3. Eyre, F. H., ed. 1980. Forest cover types of the United States and Canada. Washington, DC: Society of American Foresters. 148 p. [905] 4. Garrison, George A.; Bjugstad, Ardell J.; Duncan, Don A.; [and others]. 1977. Vegetation and environmental features of forest and range ecosystems. Agric. Handb. 475. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. 68 p. [998] 5. Hitchcock, C. Leo; Cronquist, Arthur. 1961. Vascular plants of the Pacific Northwest. Part 3: Saxifragaceae to Ericaceae. Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press. 614 p. [1167] 6. Kuchler, A. W. 1964. Manual to accompany the map of potential vegetation of the conterminous United States. Special Publication No. 36. New York: American Geographical Society. 77 p. [1384] 7. Lesica, Peter. 1984. Rare vascular plants of Glacier National Park, Montana. Missoula, MT: University of Montana, Department of Botany. 27 p. [12049] 8. Lesica, P.; Moore, G.; Peterson, K. M.; Rumely, J. H. (Montana Rare Plant Project). 1984. Vascular plants of limited distribution in Montana. Monograph No. 2. Montana Academy of Sciences, Supplement to the Proceedings, Volume 43. Bozman, MT: Montana State University, Montana Academy of Sciences. 61 p. [11656] 9. Raunkiaer, C. 1934. The life forms of plants and statistical plant geography. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 632 p. [2843] 10. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service. 1982. National list of scientific plant names. Vol. 1. List of plant names. SCS-TP-159. Washington, DC. 416 p. [11573]


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