Index of Species Information

SPECIES:  Botrychium matricariaefolium


Introductory

SPECIES: Botrychium matricariaefolium
AUTHORSHIP AND CITATION : Williams, Tara Y. 1990. Botrychium matricariaefolium. In: Fire Effects Information System, [Online]. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory (Producer). Available: http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/ [].

ABBREVIATION : BOTMAT SYNONYMS : NO-ENTRY SCS PLANT CODE : BOMA2 COMMON NAMES : camomile grape-fern daisyleaf grape-fern Matricary grape fern TAXONOMY : The currently accepted scientific name of camomile grape-fern is Botrychium matricariaefolium (Doell.) A. Braun. LIFE FORM : Fern or Fern Ally FEDERAL LEGAL STATUS : No special status OTHER STATUS : Camomile grape-fern is rare in Glacier National Park [6]. It is also extremely rare in the Applachians south of Pennsylvania [7]. The South Dakota Natural Heritage Program has listed camomile grape-fern under status code U: "Status Undertermined--possibly rare, declining, or extirpated in the state; more information is needed on present abundance and threats to determine status."


DISTRIBUTION AND OCCURRENCE

SPECIES: Botrychium matricariaefolium
GENERAL DISTRIBUTION : Camomile grape-fern is interruptedly circumboreal. It is not found at the highest latitudes. It is also found in South America. It is common in the northeastern United States and adjacent Canada [4]. Plants in Colorado and South America are ssp. hesperium [3]. ECOSYSTEMS : FRES10 White - red - jack pine FRES11 Spruce - fir FRES14 Oak - pine FRES15 Oak - hickory FRES18 Maple - beech - birch FRES13 Loblolly - shortleaf pine FRES26 Lodgepole pine STATES : CO CT HI ID IN MA MD ME MI MN MT NC NH PA TN VT VA WV AB BC LB MB NB NF NS NT ON PQ SK YT BLM PHYSIOGRAPHIC REGIONS : 8 Northern Rocky Moutains 16 Upper Missouri Basin and Broken Lands KUCHLER PLANT ASSOCIATIONS : NO-ENTRY SAF COVER TYPES : NO-ENTRY SRM (RANGELAND) COVER TYPES : NO-ENTRY HABITAT TYPES AND PLANT COMMUNITIES : NO-ENTRY

MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS

SPECIES: Botrychium matricariaefolium
IMPORTANCE TO LIVESTOCK AND WILDLIFE : NO-ENTRY PALATABILITY : NO-ENTRY NUTRITIONAL VALUE : NO-ENTRY COVER VALUE : NO-ENTRY VALUE FOR REHABILITATION OF DISTURBED SITES : Camomile grape-fern was found in a borrow pit along the main road in Glacier National Park which suggests that it will grow on disturbed sites [5]. OTHER USES AND VALUES : NO-ENTRY OTHER MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS : Camomile grape-fern is found in populations that may not persist for long periods of time. Destruction of populations during road maintenance in Glacier National Park should be avoided [5].

BOTANICAL AND ECOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS

SPECIES: Botrychium matricariaefolium
GENERAL BOTANICAL CHARACTERISTICS : Camomile grape-fern grows 4 to 12 inches (10-30 cm) tall. It is a stout plant and rather fleshy. Individuals are inconspicuous and scattered [4,7]. RAUNKIAER LIFE FORM : Undisturbed State: Hemicryptophyte Burned or Clipped State: Hemicryptophyte REGENERATION PROCESSES : NO-ENTRY SITE CHARACTERISTICS : Camomile grape-fern grows in dry or more often damp, partially shaded areas in coniferous forests or rich deciduous woods on slopes [3,4,5,7,9]. It has been reported at 4,340 feet (1,400 m) in the Southeast [9] and between 8,000 and 10,000 feet (2,580 and 3,225 m) in Colorado [3]. SUCCESSIONAL STATUS : NO-ENTRY SEASONAL DEVELOPMENT : Camomile grape-fern matures by late July or August [5].

FIRE ECOLOGY

SPECIES: Botrychium matricariaefolium
FIRE ECOLOGY OR ADAPTATIONS : NO-ENTRY POSTFIRE REGENERATION STRATEGY : NO-ENTRY

FIRE EFFECTS

SPECIES: Botrychium matricariaefolium
IMMEDIATE FIRE EFFECT ON PLANT : NO-ENTRY DISCUSSION AND QUALIFICATION OF FIRE EFFECT : NO-ENTRY PLANT RESPONSE TO FIRE : NO-ENTRY DISCUSSION AND QUALIFICATION OF PLANT RESPONSE : NO-ENTRY FIRE MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS : NO-ENTRY

REFERENCES

SPECIES: Botrychium matricariaefolium
REFERENCES : 1. Bernard, Stephen R.; Brown, Kenneth F. 1977. Distribution of mammals, reptiles, and amphibians by BLM physiographic regions and A.W. Kuchler's associations for the eleven western states. Tech. Note 301. Denver, CO: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management. 169 p. [434] 2. Harrington, H. D. 1964. Manual of the plants of Colorado. 2d ed. Chicago: The Swallow Press Inc. 666 p. [6851] 3. Hitchcock, C. Leo; Cronquist, Arthur; Ownbey, Marion. 1969. Vascular plants of the Pacific Northwest. Part 1: Vascular cryptograms, gymnosperms, and monocotyledons. Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press. 914 p. [1169] 4. Lesica, Peter. 1984. Rare vascular plants of Glacier National Park, Montana. Missoula, MT: University of Montana, Department of Botany. 27 p. [12049] 5. Lesica, P.; Moore, G.; Peterson, K. M.; Rumely, J. H. (Montana Rare Plant Project). 1984. Vascular plants of limited distribution in Montana. Monograph No. 2. Montana Academy of Sciences, Supplement to the Proceedings, Volume 43. Bozman, MT: Montana State University, Montana Academy of Sciences. 61 p. [11656] 6. Pittillo, J. Dan; Wagner, W. H., Jr.; Farrar, Donald R.; Leonard, S. W. 1975. New Pteridophyte records in the Highlands Biological Station area, southern Appalachians. Castanea. 40(4): 263-272. [14230] 7. Raunkiaer, C. 1934. The life forms of plants and statistical plant geography. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 632 p. [2843] 8. Voss, Edward G. 1972. Michigan flora. Part I. Gymnosperms and monocots. Bloomfield Hills, MI: Cranbrook Institute of Science; Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Herbarium. 488 p. [11471] 9. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service. 1982. National list of scientific plant names. Vol. 1. List of plant names. SCS-TP-159. Washington, DC. 416 p. [11573]


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