Watershed, Fish, Wildlife, Air & Rare Plants

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USDA FOREST SERVICE

Caring for the land and serving people

Watershed, Fish, Wildlife illustration of mountains, clouds, stream, a fish and an eagle, with W.F.W. at the top.

Welcome to the Forest Service - Watershed, Fish, Wildlife, Air & Rare Plants program web site. We cover a wide variety of topics and we are located across the nation. Our staff provides support and coordination to the public and the agency Regions, Forests and Districts.

This web site will give you a taste of our diversity and is designed for our various customers. We laid things out by topic with multiple paths to each topic.

If you want to understand our administrative layout select the "staff" link on the ‘Home’ tab at the top of the page (cursor over the tab). You are  welcome to contact any of our staff or web site administrator directly.

 

Our Mission

Welcome to the Forest Service - Watershed, Fish, Wildlife, Air & Rare Plants program web site. We cover a wide variety of topics and we are located across the nation. Our staff provides support and coordination to the public and the agency regions, forests and districts. This web site will give you a taste of our diversity and was designed for our various customers. We laid things out by topic with multiple paths to each topic.

Role of the Watershed, Fish, Wildlife, Air, Rare Plants, Soil & Threatened, Endangered & Sensitive Species Programs in Ecosystem Management

The WFW role is sharing leadership with other programs when meeting our land and service ethics, and carrying out our mission to be conservation leaders for the next century. Specifically - positive, recognizable, well-integrated programs that:

  • Protect, sustain, and improve the water and watershed resources and services.
  • Protect ecosystems by ensuring that proposed management activities promote conservation of biological diversity.
  • Restore deteriorated ecosystems by ensuring their biological health, diversity, and productivity.
  • Provide multiple benefits to people within the capabilities of ecosystems by enhancing ecosystem productivity, managing public access, and increasing environmental education.
  • Improve organizational effectiveness by ensuring that: appropriate skills are acquired and maintained; our customers'/owners' needs and desires are understood and used in decisionmaking through collaboration; the best science-based information is available; emphasis is placed on monitoring and evaluation; and findings are applied to improve the effectiveness of our actions.

The Chief expects line officers to develop wildlife and fish programs within the context of ecosystem management to a level of excellence that clearly demonstrates conservation leadership. The Chief expects wildlife and fisheries biologists, ecologists, and botanists to bring their special technical expertise to promote the sustainability of ecosystems. Everyone is expected to work closely with our customers and partners in accomplishing our objectives. The health, diversity, and productivity of National Forest System wildlife, fish, and plant communities -- and opportunities for their use and enjoyment -- will be the measures of our success.

Hot Topics

  • 2015 Rise to the Future Award Winners

    Below are the respective recipients of the 2015 National Rise to the Future Awards for excellence and leadership in Fisheries, Hydrology, Soil Science, and Air Programs.  Awards presented in May 2016.

    Aquatic Recreational Accomplishment:  Deborah Urich from the Tahoe National Forest and David Lass from Trout Unlimited

    Collaborative/Integrated Aquatic Stewardship – co-winner:  The Knutson Dam Improvement Project on the Chippewa National Forest

    Collaborative/Integrated Aquatic Stewardship – co-winner: Sandy River Basin Partners on the Mt. Hood National Forest, Zigzag Ranger

    Partnership: Brian Hodge from Trout Unlimited

    Professional Excellence - Fish Management – co-winner: Mark Moulton from the Sawtooth National Recreation Area

    Professional Excellence - Fish Management – co-winner: Jerry Monzingo from the Gila National Forest

    Friend of the Fish/Watershed: Johanna Kovarik from the Washington Office of Mineral & Geology

    Public Awareness: Karen Holligsworth from Wildlife Forever

    Tribal Accomplishment: The Hopi Tribe and the Kaibab National Forest

    Jim Sedell Research Achievement: The NorWeST/Climate Shield/National Stream Internet Science and Data Team

    Field Soil Scientist: Dennis Landwehr from the Tongass National Forest

    “Wagon Wheel Gap” Hydrology:  Daniel Cenderelli from the National Stream & Aquatic Ecology Center

    Special Category Award for “Lifetime Achievement”: Ron Medel from the Tongass National Forest

    Special Category Award for “Exceptional Volunteerism”:  The Quivira Coalition, working with the Carson National Forest

  • Moss & Air Pollution Monitoring

    Forest Service Ground Breaking Study

    Forest Service lichenologist Sarah Jovan and Forest Service Economist Geoff Donovan's groundbreaking study uncovered levels of cadmium and arsenic pollution high enough to cause cancer. The results have state officials rewriting air pollution rules while residents run to their doctors for blood and urine tests.

    OPB (Oregon Public Broadcasting) tells the story.

    USFS Pacific Northwest Research Station answers FAQs about the exploratory study

  • Wildlife Award Winners 2016

    Each year the USDA Forest Service recognizes outstanding individual and group achievements by natural resource professionals in the Forest Service, as well as significant partner contributions to wildlife, fish and native plant conservation.  We are pleased to announce the 2016 recipients!  Detailed descriptions about the awards and award winners will be available soon.

    2016 Jack Adams Award Recipient is Cary Thompson, Supervisory Wildlife Biologist, Flagstaff Ranger District on the Coconino National Forest.

    2016 Forest Service / Bureau of Land Management “Joint Conservation Partner” Award Recipient is the Northeastern California/Northwestern Elk Management and Aerial Surveys project.

    2016 Making Tracks

    • Group Award - Habitat Improvement Project (WEST) Award Recipient is the Grand Valley Ranger District, Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre and Gunnison National Forests
    • Group Award - Habitat Improvement Project (EAST) Award Recipient is the Hoosier National Forest
    • Group Award - Habitat Management Program Award Recipient is the Black Kettle National Grasslands, Cibola National Forest
    • Group Award - Partnership Achievement Program Award Recipient is the Ocoee Ranger District, Cherokee National Forest
    • Group Award - Conservation Education Program Award Recipient is the National Forests and Grasslands in Texas
Image of a flying animal known as a bat, located on the left side, with text You Need Me in bold bright green located in the center.

You NEED Bats ... and they need your help

The Forest Service is a leader in bat education and outreach, and we’re proud to be part of a broad coalition of private and public partners dedicated to bat conservation. Check out great resources for bat education!

 

Videos - Front Seats to Nature @ your Forest