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Cost of Fire Operations

In a , the Forest Service estimates that within a decade, the agency will spend more than two-thirds of its budget to battle ever-increasing fires, while mission-critical programs that can help prevent fires in the first place such as forest restoration and watershed and landscape management will continue to suffer. Meanwhile, the report notes, these catastrophic blazes are projected to burn twice as many acres by 2050.

 

Image uses figures representing fire staff and all other Forest Service staff to show changes in staffing from 1998 to 2015. Fire staffing has increased from 5,700 to 12,000 employees while other staffing has decreased from 18,000 to 11,000.

Image uses figures representing fire staff and all other Forest Service staff to show changes in staffing from 1998 to 2015. Fire staffing has increased from 5,700 to 12,000 employees while other staffing has decreased from 18,000 to 11,000.
In FY 1995, wildland fire cost consumed 16 percent of the Forest Service budget; in FY 2015, that rose to 52 percent; and projected costs for FY 2025 assume fire will consume 67 percent of the budget.

In FY 1995, wildland fire cost consumed 16 percent of the Forest Service budget; in FY 2015, that rose to 52 percent; and projected costs for FY 2025 assume fire will consume 67 percent of the budget.

 

Fire Funding Impacts

Alaska (PDF | 743 kb)

Arizona (PDF | 337 kb)

Arkansas (PDF | 822 kb)

Florida (PDF | 660 kb)

Oregon (PDF | 751 kb)

Wyoming (PDF | 628 kb)

 

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